Rain Lilies

ConroeJoe@aol.com ConroeJoe@aol.com
Wed, 11 Jan 2006 17:35:25 PST
Hi Gang, 

In addition to Crinum, I am fond of rain lilies.  Many or most of these 
plants seem tolerant of too much year-round rain, hot and humid summers, and some 
mild to medium frosts in winter.  They seem ideal for the Gulf Coast of Texas.  

I am looking to arrange seed trades this coming year.  Each year I have 
zillions of seeds of Cooperia pedunculata and Z. chlorosolen to trade (take your 
pick on synonyms).  Additionally, I have innumerable seeds of what I think it H. 
robustus (pick your synonyms).  The C. pedunculata and Z. chlorosolen seeds 
are from wild-collected, roadside plants in Central or Eastern Texas.  

Anyway, if you are interested in trading seeds please write to me as the 
season advances, or if you are in the Southern Hemisphere, perhaps your plants are 
already in seed.  I may have small amounts of other types of rainlily seeds 
to trade.  

I'm especially interested to obtain seed from Central or South American 
rainlily plants or garden hybrids of known background (or just pretty).  

I think C. pedunculata produces a prettier flower, but Z chlorosolen is such 
a carefree fall bloomer that I think it is a better garden plant.  

LINK:  C. pedunculata


LINK:  Z. chlorosolen (note the long floral tube, 4-5 inches)


Conroe Joe
P.S. One reason I grow rainlilies is that they are so happy to live in 1-, 3- 
or 5-gallon pots. I can even tuck them in around the base of large specimen 
agaves and palms in pots.  Rainlilies don't seem to require special soils and 
some seem to bloom better if in spare soils.  They tolerate too much sun, not 
enough sun, irregular watering, regular watering, and even hot sun baking the 
sides of containers.  I don't know if they are hardy in zone 8 or colder, but 
they seem happy to accept frosts in the greater Houston area.  

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