Merodon equestris (Narcissus bulb fly, greater bulb fly, large bulb fly, large Narcissus fly)

Lee Poulsen wpoulsen@pacbell.net
Wed, 14 Nov 2012 12:00:24 PST
I am like Michael and apply a granular Imidacloprid product once a year usually in mid to late spring so that the plant takes it into its tissues before it becomes dormant. Luckily, the Narcissus fly seems to attack my Narcissus more often than any other plant (except for Cyrtanthus which must be Narcissus fly candy), so those two genera are the ones I especially make sure to dose. Now I basically never even see Narcissus flies, and I no longer get lots of random bulb deaths, especially right after dormancy when I can't see it happen. 

Also like Michael, I only apply it to my potted plants.

As for the mite problem, there are only a few of my species that seem to be affected by them, and they are the same ones year after year. Bayer makes an insecticide for Roses that has a systemic miticide in it, so I apply that to those specific species at the same time I do my yearly Imidacloprid application, and it has reduced the mite incidence greatly.

Other than that, I tend to be an "organic" gardener due to laziness more than anything else.   ;-)

--Lee Poulsen
Pasadena, California, USA - USDA Zone 10a
Latitude 34°N, Altitude 1150 ft/350 m

On Nov 14, 2012, at 9:53 AM, Bonsaigai37@aol.com wrote:

> I've been using a product containing Imidacloprid to control the beasts.  A granular allpied once a year during Merodon flight/breeding season will usually keep the critters from infesting bulbs, especially the ones in pots.  In ground control can be trickier.  I'm less apt to apply Imidacloprid to the garden, as it is systemic and will kill other beneficial insects.
> 
> 
> Its use will also cause mites to become "extra-fecund".  The population can explode and predators may have been eliminated.  
> 
> 
> I always use pesticides will great caution, regardless of product.  Sometimes, it's just necessary.
> 
> 
> Michael
> Interlaken, NY Z6
> 
> 






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