disinfecting seeds - was Import permits

Karl Church 64kkmjr@gmail.com
Sat, 23 Feb 2013 09:49:30 PST
Richard, as a Master Gardener, I agree whole heartedly with your
suggestions.
Karl Church
Dinuba, CA
Zone 9a
On Feb 23, 2013 9:40 AM, "Richard" <richrd@nas.com> wrote:

> Gastil
>
> I usually weigh in on this issue now and then because I am concerned the
> regulatory system has holes as large as the current gun control debate.
> Seriously, I would not accept bulbs or live plant material from California
> regions flagged with Sudden Oak Death, unless is certified clean. I had a
> conversation at the Berkley get together that left me gasping. A couple
> growing and distributing bulbs that had their rhododendrons die.
>
> I have received seed from overseas shipped 'under the radar' that included
> large pieces of debris and also from the exchanges. We were briefed by
> APHIS in spring 2012 and I asked directly about moving seed around. They
> are not concerned about clean seed but were about debris. However in some
> species there are seed borne diseases ie smut in grains etc, so some
> research is advised. In context of sudden oak death APHIS is not concerned.
> However since we collect seed from wild, California to Montana to
> Washington we are very careful how we handle our seed cleaning debris.
> Ours, including fruit pulp all goes to the burn pile. Liquids are washed
> into a septic system.
>
> Once the seed is clean a chlorox wash then water rince, would be a wise
> practice. For some of our seed going into stratification we dip in captan
> and ridomil to eliminate molds during strat. This works very good.  If the
> seed is clean and no signs of soil or vegetative debris I would go ahead
> and sow if it is local seed.
>
>
>
> Richard Haard, Propagation Manager
> Fourth Corner Nurseries
> 5652 Sand Road
> Bellingham, Washington, 98226.
> 360 592 2250
> cell 360 201 5174
> http://fourthcornernurseries.com/index.html
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2013, at 8:51 AM, "M. Gastil-Buhl" <gastil.buhl@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Hi Richard,
> >
> > I took what you wrote to heart. Your precautions for your nursery
> > sound wise.
> > You wrote "let the regulatory system function."
> >
> > My intention in writing to pbs about import permits was to encourage
> > people to play the game by the rules, to get a permit.
> > I am so sorry if what I wrote implied I was suggesting anyone bypass
> > the regulatory system.
> > Of the 3 orders I have imported, all 3 got to me without any apparent
> > miss-handling.
> > The most recent was mailed from South Africa on Feb 4 and arrived at
> > my door Feb 18, having been forwarded from the Plant Inspection
> > Station in San Diego.
> >
> > The imported seeds are subject to inspection for prohibited species.
> > And I certainly do not want my neighbors to import an Oxalis pes-
> > caprae that sets seeds, for example.
> >
> > But maybe the biggest danger is from the smallest organisms, microbes.
> > You mention taking care to dispose of the "debris collected in the
> > seed cleaning process".
> > But I guess that microbes on pods or chaff may have already inoculated
> > the seeds.
> > I wonder if perhaps I should request the seeds be treated prior to
> > export, when that is available.
> > Would you recommend treatment of seeds upon receipt with a dry
> > fungicide powder?
> > Or would a brief bleach soak and rinse just prior to sowing be
> > sufficient?
> > Or is that unnecessary?
> >
> > - Gastil
> >
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