pbs Digest, Vol 130, Issue 14

Ben Zonneveld ben.zonneveld@naturalis.nl
Thu, 07 Nov 2013 03:32:19 PST
Two bits of info
Crocus sativus is triploid and C cartwrightianus diploid
Instead of the very poisonous colchicine nowadays Oryzalin
is used to double the amount of DNA
Ben Zonneveld


2013/11/7 <pbs-request@lists.ibiblio.org>

> Send pbs mailing list submissions to
>         pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
>         http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
>         pbs-request@lists.ibiblio.org
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
>         pbs-owner@lists.ibiblio.org
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of pbs digest..."
>
>
> List-Post:&lt;mailto:pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> List-Archive:&lt;http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Re: Saffron Bonanza (Jane McGary)
>    2. Re: Saffron Bonanza (Mark BROWN)
>    3. BX 352 (Robert Werra)
>    4. Re: Narcissus bulbocodium in Northern gardens (Peter Taggart)
>    5. Re: BX 352 (Roy Herold)
>    6. Australian Seeds ? (The Silent Seed)
>    7. Re: Narcissus bulbocodium in Northern gardens
>       (clayton3120 clayton3120)
>    8. Crocus & Wheat Embryos (steven hart)
>    9. Re: Crocus & Wheat Embryos (Jim McKenney)
>   10. Re: Crocus & Wheat Embryos (arnold140@verizon.net)
>   11. Re: Crocus & Wheat Embryos (Peter Taggart)
>   12. Re: Crocus & Wheat Embryos (Steven)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 06 Nov 2013 09:57:02 -0800
> From: Jane McGary <janemcgary@earthlink.net>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Saffron Bonanza
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <E1Ve7Ov-0004dT-J0@elasmtp-kukur.atl.sa.earthlink.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
>
> Lee wrote
> >I have always wondered how in the world the first people to try the
> >styles in cooking thought to do so. I can understand throwing
> >flowers into a cuisine, the whole flower, like squash blossoms or
> >nasturtium petals. But just the styles? What were they thinking?
>
> I believe that saffron was historically used more as a dye than as a
> flavoring. I've seen Elizabethan recipes implying that banquet
> specialties were "gilded" by being colored with saffron. It is also
> used to dye cloth. Annatto and turmeric are also used more as
> coloring than as flavoring. Not all people like the taste of saffron.
> I don't bother to collect it because it tastes unpleasant to me; if I
> want to "gild" rice or some other dish, I'd rather use turmeric.
>
> Jane McGary
> Portland, Oregon, USA
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 22:17:39 +0100 (CET)
> From: Mark BROWN <brown.mark@wanadoo.fr>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Saffron Bonanza
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <976488064.34832.1383772659039.JavaMail.www@wwinf1e21>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> I too have noticed how well the saffron has flowered this year but
> unfortunately there has been so much rain that soon spoils the flowers if
> you are not quick to gather their styles.
> I have used Crocus cartwrughtianus albus styles also and yes they are more
> fiddly and small.
> This spring in Corsica I came across such amazing sheets of Crocus
> corsicus with varying sizes of flowers and styles that we harvested quite a
> lot. The flavour was milder but good. The colour was nowhere near as
> intense though.
> No crocus species is toxic as far as I know, so one can assume that their
> styles are all edible too. But it is only C. sativus that has such intense
> flavour and colour on a larger style.?
> I sometimes get migraine after eating saffron. But not always.
> Mark
> Haute Normandie,
> France
>
>
>
> " Message du 06/11/13 05:26
> > De : "Makiko Goto-Widerman"
> > A : "Pacific Bulb Society"
> >
> > One time I planted white saffron. I'm wondering if they are also edible."
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 12:57:40 -0800
> From: "Robert Werra" <robertwerra@pacific.net>
> Subject: [pbs] BX 352
> To: <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Cc: robert Werra <robertwerra@pacific.net>
> Message-ID: <59C3882800DB46F0866F45A3A5BE7472@Game1>
> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Re BX352   I sent seeds and cormlets of Moraeas, Calochorti, and
> Fritillaria to BX 352. As usual all were gone and BX closed in 24 hours.
> It's against protocol, but I held back about half. Why? Because unless
> interested persons check their Email several times every day, they will be
> too late. So for those of you who are sluggards like myself, I have some
> seeds of Calochortus albus,amabilis,obispoensis,unifloris,venustus
> (lavender),weedii (yellow), Moraea tripetela, tulbaghensis, polyanthos,
> vegeta, vespertina and Fritillaria affinis and biflora. They are all winter
> rainfall so it is not too late to plant in No. hemisphere. If interested,
> contact me. Seeds, comments, and mailing are free, but a donation to PBS
> would be welcome.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 22:14:12 +0000
> From: Peter Taggart <petersirises@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Narcissus bulbocodium in Northern gardens
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CAELwaKh8Cr_hXw_1Ja5bBreY-RrY_EA34-Xj0yizG8KdRQyZzQ@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>
> I suggest that precocious top growth being damaged by frost may be the
> problem. If by careful siting or other means, the bulbs can be kept fairly
> dry, after rooting until the coldest part of winter is over, early leaf
> growth may be kept to a minimum and the plants take the cold better. As
> they do like water in growth, extra watering and feeding might be required
> in spring in order to compensate for the shortened growing season.
> Peter (UK)
>
>
> On Wed, Nov 6, 2013 at 4:57 PM, <bonsaigai37@aol.com> wrote:
>
> > Jim,
> >
> >
> > I tried the 'Oregon Strain' without much success.  Only one is coming up
> > this fall, but I haven't checked this week.  I was hoping for better.
>  Down
> > the hill, towards Ithaca, in the local banana belt, they grow it will.
> >
> >         I have tried and never succeeded with Narc. bulbocodium in my
> > outdoor gardens
> > here in Kansas City MO - Zone 5/6.
> >         Has any one tried this ?Oregon Strain? in colder climates. What
> > success?        I
> > have planted a few outdoors in a slightly raised bed and others in a pot
> > for the
> > cool GH where I know they do quite well.
> >
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Wed, 06 Nov 2013 17:17:46 -0500
> From: Roy Herold <rherold@yahoo.com>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] BX 352
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Cc: robert Werra <robertwerra@pacific.net>
> Message-ID: <527AC00A.20308@yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
> Robert Werra wrote:
>  > Re BX352   As usual all were gone and BX closed in 24 hours.
> It's against protocol, but I held back about half.
>
> Bravo, Bob, and thanks!
>
> I, too, have received requests from members for seeds or bulbs I donated
> to the BX that ran out before they could order. I've been more than
> happy to honor requests if I have any left, even to the extent of
> digging already potted bulbs. With free postage and all that--happy to
> share the wealth as long as they go to PBS members. Sometimes I get some
> neat stuff in return, but that isn't the goal.
>
> True, working or otherwise busy folks who don't have the luxury of
> frequently checking email miss out on many of the BX offerings. There
> probably isn't an easy way to be fair to everyone, however.
>
> Thanks to Dell, too. He's a saint!
>
> --Roy
> NW of Boston
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 20:12:02 -0500 (EST)
> From: The Silent Seed <santoury@aol.com>
> Subject: [pbs] Australian Seeds ?
> To: pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> Message-ID: <8D0A96D7FBD4714-1A74-A638@webmail-m236.sysops.aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>
> Hi folks,
> I know some of you live in Australia.
> I am wondering if I might ask for help in finding sources for bulk seeds
> of Australian tree natives, especially Brachychiton?
> If you can help, or can point me in a good direction, please email me
> privately, since I do not wish to clutter the PBS list needlessly.
> (Please do not send me to E-Bay - I am fully aware of those.)
> Best, Jude
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 18:00:29 -0800
> From: clayton3120 clayton3120 <clayton3120@cablespeed.com>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Narcissus bulbocodium in Northern gardens
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
>         <CABubAXetwgjTm4qk4W8gR=Dj=
> PmoKKNj7ozY7CptCRi0BeRQ+g@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>
> Peter is correct in his assessment of Narcissus bulbocodium culture.   I
> raise N. bulbocodium  outside in pots, AND in the ground, but out of direct
> heavy rain, which, for Seattle gardeners, is the key to may Mediterranean
> plants and bulbs.  These bulbs are being raised in USDA zone 8b, so
> considerably milder than zone 5-6.   The soil is quite well drained.  It
> just may not be the best species for your climate unless you have a cool
> greenhouse
> Rick K
>
>
> On Wed, Nov 6, 2013 at 2:14 PM, Peter Taggart <petersirises@gmail.com
> >wrote:
>
> > I suggest that precocious top growth being damaged by frost may be the
> > problem. If by careful siting or other means, the bulbs can be kept
> fairly
> > dry, after rooting until the coldest part of winter is over, early leaf
> > growth may be kept to a minimum and the plants take the cold better. As
> > they do like water in growth, extra watering and feeding might be
> required
> > in spring in order to compensate for the shortened growing season.
> > Peter (UK)
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Nov 6, 2013 at 4:57 PM, <bonsaigai37@aol.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Jim,
> > >
> > >
> > > I tried the 'Oregon Strain' without much success.  Only one is coming
> up
> > > this fall, but I haven't checked this week.  I was hoping for better.
> >  Down
> > > the hill, towards Ithaca, in the local banana belt, they grow it will.
> > >
> > >         I have tried and never succeeded with Narc. bulbocodium in my
> > > outdoor gardens
> > > here in Kansas City MO - Zone 5/6.
> > >         Has any one tried this ?Oregon Strain? in colder climates. What
> > > success?        I
> > > have planted a few outdoors in a slightly raised bed and others in a
> pot
> > > for the
> > > cool GH where I know they do quite well.
> > >
> > >
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2013 12:54:29 +1000
> From: steven hart <hartsentwine.australia@gmail.com>
> Subject: [pbs] Crocus & Wheat Embryos
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
>         <CACm0T0cwjUPnwjfa4aPB3B2Te2-_=
> pAQPSeFj2zx8jRi0+2mhA@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> In interesting message someone sent me that the crocus growers might be
> interested in..
>
> Steve. I know spectacularly little about bulbs, but it's cool see such
> passion.
>
> I can tell you that the wheat development program I assisted in a couple of
> years could not have happened if not for crocus bulbs...the bulb contains
> an extremely dangerous but useful compound called colchicine,which we used
> to double chromosome a number of haploid wheat embryos
>
> I don't know anything about it but thought it was amazing.. Not sure I
> think its a good idea, but still amazing....
> --
> Steven : )
> Esk Queensland Australia
> Summer Zone 5  Winter Zone 10
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 19:38:39 -0800 (PST)
> From: Jim McKenney <jamesamckenney@verizon.net>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Crocus & Wheat Embryos
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
>         <1383795519.24413.YahooMailNeo@web121301.mail.ne1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> Steve, the "crocus bulbs" mentioned in your friend's letter were colchicum
> "bulbs".?
>
> Jim McKenney
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Wed, 06 Nov 2013 21:39:37 -0600 (CST)
> From: arnold140@verizon.net
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Crocus & Wheat Embryos
> To: pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> Message-ID: <17906910.670390.1383795577647.JavaMail.root@vznit170182>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
>  Steve:
>
> I think you'll find the drug colchicine in the "Autumn Crocus" better know
> as  Colchicum.
>
> A great drug for the treatment of gout.
>
> Arnold
> New Jersey
>
>
> On 11/06/13, steven hart wrote:
>
> In interesting message someone sent me that the crocus growers might be
> interested in..
>
> Steve. I know spectacularly little about bulbs, but it's cool see such
> passion.
>
> I can tell you that the wheat development program I assisted in a couple of
> years could not have happened if not for crocus bulbs...the bulb contains
> an extremely dangerous but useful compound called colchicine,which we used
> to double chromosome a number of haploid wheat embryos
>
> I don't know anything about it but thought it was amazing.. Not sure I
> think its a good idea, but still amazing....
> --
> Steven : )
> Esk Queensland Australia
> Summer Zone 5 Winter Zone 10
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2013 07:26:29 +0000
> From: Peter Taggart <petersirises@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Crocus & Wheat Embryos
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
>         <CAELwaKgeRFODkFEo6TJO2m6ETcX=nOFNe-MxzLZZyo=
> PJHjMDA@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> Colchicine is used to raise the ploidy of embryos.
> I have read accounts of deaths from the eating of Clochicum bulbs and from
> overdose of the medicine. Multiple organ failure and no remedy..... it is
> absolutely horrific and does not require a lot of the plant or of the drug.
>
> Though the Iris family is generally thought to be poisonous; not only
> saffron is eaten, the corms of some Crocus are eaten as if they were nuts.
> IT IS IMPORTANT NOT TO CONFUSE COLCHICUM WITH CROCUS!!!
>
>
> On Thu, Nov 7, 2013 at 3:39 AM, <arnold140@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> >  Steve:
> >
> > I think you'll find the drug colchicine in the "Autumn Crocus" better
> know
> > as  Colchicum.
> >
> > A great drug for the treatment of gout.
> >
> > I can tell you that the wheat development program I assisted in a couple
> of
> > years could not have happened if not for crocus bulbs...the bulb contains
> > an extremely dangerous but useful compound called colchicine,which we
> used
> > to double chromosome a number of haploid wheat embryos
> >
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 12
> Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2013 19:40:10 +1000
> From: Steven <hartsentwine.australia@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Crocus & Wheat Embryos
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <5EFD70C9-1A4D-4B8E-8361-D065093424BE@gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset=us-ascii
>
> Thanks guys, that's all fascinating !
>
> Steven :  )
>
> On 07/11/2013, at 5:26 PM, Peter Taggart <petersirises@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Colchicine is used to raise the ploidy of embryos.
> > I have read accounts of deaths from the eating of Clochicum bulbs and
> from
> > overdose of the medicine. Multiple organ failure and no remedy..... it is
> > absolutely horrific and does not require a lot of the plant or of the
> drug.
> >
> > Though the Iris family is generally thought to be poisonous; not only
> > saffron is eaten, the corms of some Crocus are eaten as if they were
> nuts.
> > IT IS IMPORTANT NOT TO CONFUSE COLCHICUM WITH CROCUS!!!
> >
> >
> > On Thu, Nov 7, 2013 at 3:39 AM, <arnold140@verizon.net> wrote:
> >
> >> Steve:
> >>
> >> I think you'll find the drug colchicine in the "Autumn Crocus" better
> know
> >> as  Colchicum.
> >>
> >> A great drug for the treatment of gout.
> >>
> >> I can tell you that the wheat development program I assisted in a
> couple of
> >> years could not have happened if not for crocus bulbs...the bulb
> contains
> >> an extremely dangerous but useful compound called colchicine,which we
> used
> >> to double chromosome a number of haploid wheat embryos
> >>
> >>
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
> > http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> http://www.pacificbulbsociety.org/list.php
>
>
> End of pbs Digest, Vol 130, Issue 14
> ************************************
>



-- 

T 071-5274738, M

Einsteinweg 2 - 2333 CC Leiden
E Ben.Zonneveld@naturalis.nl I , http://www.naturalis.nl/





More information about the pbs mailing list