Variable Texas weather

Cynthia Mueller cynthiasbulbs@hotmail.com
Sun, 26 Jan 2014 14:51:51 PST
Alberto, I've never seen seed pods under normal circumstances on Iris x albicans. One year pods did begin to form on both the I albicans and on nearby Byzantine gladiolus, a Southern US form which has larger, more flamboyant  magenta flowers than the things illustrated in European seed catalogs. The explanation was, a shapeless mustard-yellow fungus present that spring in that particular flowerbed. It may have come in on mulch shreds. It frothed up in mats and tended to clamber up stems of nearby plants about six inches. I was thrilled that perhaps this unknown fungus was supplying a missing stimulus to create seed pods and - perhaps! - seeds. After long waiting I saw that the bulging pods were empty inside. -Cynthia Mueller

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 26, 2014, at 2:23 PM, "Alberto" <ezeizabotgard@hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Concerning Iris albicans, have you ever noticed seed production in those isolated clumps?
> 
> 
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