Chamaelirium luteum

Ellen Hornig hornig@oswego.edu
Mon, 16 Jun 2014 14:27:14 PDT
I'd add to that that that since it's dioecious. if you want seeds you need
to plant groupings of seedlings.  The females are not particularly
attractive - it's the males that have those fun, twisted flower stalks
(explaining the common name "devil's bit").  I have only one female and
three males left, which makes me nervous - I'm definitely hoping for seed
this year.  Last year was too dry, so none was set.

Ellen


On Mon, Jun 16, 2014 at 4:04 PM, aaron floden via pbs <pbs@lists.ibiblio.org
> wrote:

> Chamaelirium is easy to grow from fresh seed and matures in about 3 years.
> It rarely offsets so rhizomes are hard to divide. I assume, but have never
> tried, that cutting the terminal end off will induce growth of secondary
> buds along the rhizome.
>
>
> I would hardly say that it is rare. Like with other plants, "uncommon, but
> locally abundant" would describe it better. I see it in mesic to dry oak
> woods, on shaded roadsides, creek banks, and even relatively acidic dry
> woodland so it is habitat nonspecific. That said, it can be picky in the
> garden at times and only flowers every other year or so -- none of mine are
> flowering this year and all flowered last year.
>
>  Aaron
>  E Tennessee
>
>
>
> On Monday, June 16, 2014 1:55 PM, T O <enoster@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hi,
>
> I was wondering if anyone has had any experience growing Chamaelirium
> luteum, from seed or otherwise. It is not included on the wiki, for some
> reason, although it grows from a rhizome.
>
> It is an EAm native, though reportedly rare. Horizon Herbs (Williams, OR)
> offers seed of this and I'd like to give it a try.
>
> Thanks,
> -Travis
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-- 
Ellen Hornig
212 Grafton St
Shrewsbury MA 01545





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