Drimia Group

Drimia is a genus in the Hyacinthaceae family with white to yellowish green or brown short lived flowers. Taxonomists have now included a number of genera in this genus once separated as other genera. The subgroups in this expanded genus are: Drimia - Litanthus - Rhadamanthus - Tenicroa - Urginea

This wiki page illustrates the members of the Drimia group and includes species previously named Thuranthos. The Drimia index includes a table with all the species in the subgroups in this genus listed by name.


Drimia anomala (Baker) Baker, syn. Geschollia anomala (Baker) Speta, syn. Ornithogalum anomalum Baker is distributed in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. It has round green bulbs, one long slender succulent leaf produced with the flowers and grows from 0.8 to 1 m. The greenish yellow flowers are formed in a dense raceme. Photos 1-3 taken by Cameron McMaster in the Eastern Cape. Photos 4-5 by Alessandro Marinello.

Drimia anomala, Cookhouse, Cameron McMasterDrimia anomala, Fort Brown, Cameron McMasterDrimia anomala, Somerset East, Cameron McMasterDrimia anomala, Alessandro MarinelloDrimia anomala, Alessandro Marinello

Drimia capensis is found in mostly clay but also deep red sands and limestone from southern Namaqualand to the Eastern Cape. It grows from 1 to 2 meters high. Bulbs become very large and are underground or partly exposed. The slightly undulate large leaves are dry at flowering. Flowers are white to yellowish with green keels. Photos taken by Cameron McMaster in the Overberg.

Drimia capensis, Cameron McMasterDrimia capensis, Cameron McMaster

Drimia elata syn. Drimia robusta is found in grassland, sandy and clay soils from Namaqualand to the Cape Peninsula, South Africa to Eastern Africa. It has purplish brown, greenish or whitish flowers in a crowded raceme on an erect to spreading stalk. Photos from Cameron McMaster taken in the Overberg and Eastern Cape.

Drimia elata, Cameron McMasterDrimia elata, Bredasdorp, Cameron McMasterDrimia elata, Bredasdorp, Cameron McMasterDrimia elata, Eastern Cape, Cameron McMasterDrimia elata, Eastern Cape, Cameron McMasterDrimia elata, Waainek, Cameron McMaster

Drimia haworthioides is native to South Africa. The bulb scales are large and are open. These are not often exposed, but they are grown exposed for aesthetic. Each bulb scale can be removed and new plants can be grown from it. This species is popular with cacti and succulent growers. Photos 1 and 2 were taken by Nhu Nguyen. Photo 3-5 are from Nick de Rothschild and were discussed on the PBS list. Photo 5 show bulbils with start of leaf growth, and was taken 2 weeks after the flower photos.

Drimia haworthioides, Nhu NguyenDrimia haworthioides, Nhu NguyenDrimia haworthioides, Nick de RothschildDrimia haworthioides, Nick de RothschildDrimia haworthioides, Nick de Rothschild

Drimia macrantha (Baker) Baker known most recently as Thuranthos nocturnale is a southern Africa species with flowers that open late in the day. Photos taken by Mary Sue Ittner January 2010 at Waainek in the Eastern Cape on a cool (for summer) overcast day when the flowers were open earlier. It was difficult to photograph a whole plant all in focus so the photos show various features (buds, leaves, close-ups of flowers at different stages.)

Drimia macrantha, Waainek, Mary Sue IttnerDrimia macrantha, Waainek, Mary Sue IttnerDrimia macrantha, Waainek, Mary Sue IttnerDrimia macrantha, Waainek, Mary Sue IttnerDrimia macrantha, Waainek, Mary Sue Ittner

Drimia minor is found on sandy flats in the Cape Province. It has terete erect leaves mostly dry at flowering and grows from 5 to 20 cm high. It has a few white to brownish small flowers and blooms from November to March. Photos by Andrew Harvie taken in the De Hoop Nature Reserve.

Drimia minor, De Hoop Nature Reserve, Andrew HarvieDrimia minor, De Hoop Nature Reserve, Andrew Harvie

Drimia salteri grows on sandy or stony soils in the southwest Cape. Plants grow to 25 cm. The white to brown or maroon flowers that are open at night are crowded in a slender raceme. It flowers late spring into summer. Photo taken by Cameron McMaster near Napier in the Overberg.

Drimia salteri, Napier, Cameron McMaster

Drimia sphaerocephala is found in grassland in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. This species flowers before the leaves. Flowers are white, pink, or mauve with a short tube and tepals folded back. It flowers in summer. Photo from Cameron McMaster taken at Satansnek Pass.

Drimia sphaerocephala, Satansnek, Cameron McMaster

Drimia zambesiaca (Baker) J.C. Manning & Goldblatt, comb. nov. Thuranthos zambesiacum (Baker), syn. Urginea zambesiaca Baker, is listed on the Kew checklist as distributed in Mozambique. The inflorescence appears in mid to late July with the flowers opening in succession up the stem about a month later. Seed pods ripen and shed seeds before the start of the rainy season and only then do the leaves emerge as the rains start. Bulb scales are easily separated and used to propagate new plants as done with Lilium (see Lilium bulbs for an example). Photos were taken by Nicholas Wightman near Lilayi, Zambia.

Drimia zambesiaca, Lilayi, Nicholas WightmanDrimia zambesiaca, Lilayi, Nicholas WightmanDrimia zambesiaca, Lilayi, Nicholas WightmanDrimia zambesiaca, Lilayi, Nicholas WightmanDrimia zambesiaca, Lilayi, Nicholas WightmanDrimia zambesiaca seed, Nicholas Wightman

Drimia index - Litanthus - Rhadamanthus - Tenicroa - Urginea


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Page last modified on December 22, 2014, at 04:42 PM