Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens

Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens is a rare jewel, the only public garden in the continental United States fronting directly on the ocean. The Gardens offers everything from colorful displays to thunderous waves. The mild maritime climate makes it a garden for all seasons, attracting gardeners and nature lovers alike. Manicured formal gardens, a dense coastal pine forest, fern-covered canyons, diverse plant collections, and flower-filled coastal bluffs overlooking the blue Pacific Ocean are among the many attractions. Whale fanciers can take shelter in the Cliff House to watch winter and spring migrations, bird watchers will delight in the over 100 species of birds that live in or visit the Gardens annually. There is a collection of over 120 different Dahlia cultivars, blooming in a wild profusion of color from summer to early fall. Tuberous begonias fill the Mae E. Lauer Display House through the summer.

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Below are some images taken in the garden.


Alstroemeria pulchella (syn. Alstroemeria psittacina) photographed by Mary Sue Ittner August 2004.

Alstroemeria pulchella, Mary Sue Ittner

Arum sp. shown in fruit the end of July 2014 was being admired by visitors. Photograph by Mary Sue Ittner.

Unknown Arum, possibly Arum italicum, in fruit, July 2014, Mary Sue Ittner

Begonia boliviensis is a tuberous species native to Bolivia. Photos were taken by Mary Sue Ittner of plants blooming summer 2004 in Mae E. Lauer Display House at the Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens.

Begonia boliviensis, Mary Sue IttnerBegonia boliviensis, Mary Sue Ittner

Begonia × tuberhybrida cultivars in the Mae E. Lauer Display House were photographed the end of July 2014 by Mary Sue Ittner.

tuberous Begonia cultivar, Mary Sue Ittnertuberous Begonia cultivar, Mary Sue Ittnertuberous Begonia cultivar, Mary Sue Ittnertuberous Begonia cultivar, Mary Sue Ittnertuberous Begonia cultivar, Mary Sue Ittnertuberous Begonia cultivar, Mary Sue Ittner

Crocosmia masoniorum is a species from the Eastern Cape of south Africa. The photos below could be of a named cultivar and were taken summer 2004 by Bob Rutemoeller. These plants made a come back after a deer fence was added and were thought lost in the past.

Crocosmia masoniorum, Bob RutemoellerCrocosmia masoniorum, Bob Rutemoeller

Cyclamen hederifolium has been planted next to some of the paths and was blooming the end of July 2014. Photos from Mary Sue Ittner.

Cyclamen hederifolium, Mary Sue IttnerCyclamen hederifolium, Mary Sue Ittner

Dahlia cultivars are shown below. Photos taken by Mary Sue Ittner August 2004.

Dahlia 'Ballerina', Mary Sue IttnerDahlia 'Barbarossa', Mary Sue IttnerDahlia 'Curly Que', Mary Sue IttnerDahlia 'Purple Joy', Mary Sue IttnerDahlia 'Summer's End', Mary Sue Ittner
Dahlia 'Swan's Sunset', Mary Sue IttnerDahlia 'Thomas Edison', Mary Sue IttnerDahlia cultivar, Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, Mary Sue IttnerDahlia cultivar, Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, Mary Sue IttnerDahlia cultivar, Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, Mary Sue Ittner
Dahlia cultivar, Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, Mary Sue IttnerDahlia cultivar, Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, Mary Sue IttnerDahlia cultivar, Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, Mary Sue IttnerPurple Dahlia cultivar, Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, Mary Sue IttnerDahlia cultivars, Mendocino Coast Botanical Garden, Mary Sue Ittner

Dahlia imperialis is native to Central from Mexico to Panama. It is known as a tree dahlia because it can reach enormous height up to 9 m (30ft). It is a winter dormant and summer growing species. Plants in the North Coast of California, US bloom in late November. Photos 3-4 were taken by Bob Rutemoeller at the Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens.

Dahlia imperialis, Bob RutemoellerDahlia imperialis, Bob Rutemoeller

Eucomis comosa is a plant from South Africa. This photo was taken August 2004 by Mary Sue Ittner.

Eucomis comosa, Mary Sue Ittner

Gladiolus papilio is a species from the summer rainfall area of South Africa. Photos were taken by Bob Rutemoeller summer 2004.

Gladiolus papilio, Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, Bob RutemoellerGladiolus papilio, Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, Bob Rutemoeller

Ixia viridiflora, a plant from South Africa, is shown blooming in the cactus garden. Photo taken by Kristina Van Wert in 2003.

Ixia viridiflora, Kristina Van Wert

Kniphofia 'Bees Sunset' blooming July 2004. Photos by Bob Rutemoeller.

Kniphofia 'Bees Sunset', Bob RutemoellerKniphofia 'Bees Sunset', Bob Rutemoeller

Maianthemum dilatatum (False Lily of the Valley) is found in moist shady woods in California and was photographed by Mary Sue Ittner in one of the natural areas of the gardens.

Maianthemum dilatatum, Mary Sue Ittner

Rigidella orthantha syn. Tigridia orthantha is a cloud forest plant from Guatemala and Mexico. The photos below were taken June 2007 by Mary Sue Ittner.

Tigridia orthantha, Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, Mary Sue IttnerTigridia orthantha, Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, Mary Sue IttnerTigridia orthantha, Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, Mary Sue Ittner

Tritonia disticha is a plant from South Africa. The photograph by Bob Rutemoeller shows one blooming in the August 2004 combined nicely with a clump of Agapanthus.

Tritonia disticha, Bob Rutemoeller

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Page last modified on February 08, 2015, at 04:27 PM