Resnova megaphylla

Started by Rdevries, April 24, 2022, 05:19:00 AM

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Rdevries

Resnova megaphylla is beginning to emerge

Rdevries

#1
Resnova pilosa

MarcR

Marc Rosenblum

Falls City, OR USA

I am in USDA zone 8b where temperatures almost never fall below 15F  -9.4C.  Rainfall 50"+  but none  June-September.  We seldom get snow; but when it comes we get 30" overnight.  soil is sandy loam with a lot of humus.  Oregon- where Dallas is NNW of Phoenix.

Rdevries

Resnova from leaf cuttings. Clay pot of 2018 cuttings (4years) a d plastic pot of 2019 cuttings of a dark leafed form (3 years)

Diane Whitehead

How do you make the leaf cuttings?  Will any piece of leaf work?
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

David Pilling


Diane Whitehead

#6
I don't grow Resnova, but there are a number of other genera in the same family that I do grow, so I will have fun experimenting with them.

I wonder if other families can also be propagated this way. Shall I chop some tulip or narcissus leaves? Nerine? Clivia?
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

David Pilling

Diane see the leaf cutting page for more gennera. I was going to do some experiments but did not get around to it - seemingly things like snowdrops and narcissus can be propagated this way.

Diane Whitehead

Snowdrops!  Now if I had one of those thousand dollar ones, I could impress everyone with a million dollar clump.
Diane Whitehead        Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

David Pilling

Pulling a leaf off your $1000 snowdrop would be less emotional labor than cutting it into quarters.

Rdevries

Diane, 
You probably need to find leaves early in their season, so too late for tulips. I suspect tulips could make bulblets on a damaged flower scape early in season when the bud is emerging. 
Lilies yes, if you chop off the top of the plant before the flower bud form to make bulbils on the wound.

I damaged a scape on the thog from Ceres before the second (flowering) one emerged and the 99% severed stem made bulblets in lieu of the flower.  Which is cool because i never get seed or offsets on this plant. 

In Last years discussion someone stated that leaf cutting do not work on Ledebouria. You should test this! 
Now is the time to take resnova leaf cuttings. 

David Pilling

#11
Lilies - sort of chimes with what I heard in the distant past. Many lilies form bulbils on their stems, but many do not. I wonder if all are open to leaf cuttings.

There is a post on the PBS list about Clivia leaves growing bulblets.

Steve Marak

Quote from: Rdevries on May 12, 2022, 08:39:08 AMIn Last years discussion someone stated that leaf cutting do not work on Ledebouria. You should test this!
Now is the time to take resnova leaf cuttings. 
Interesting. I was one of those last year asking about propagating Ledebouria from leaf cuttings. I have several L. zebrina I'd like to propagate, and none has ever made an offset. I tried several cuttings from each of them last year, taken after flowering but well before any signs of leaf senescence. Total failure. But I'll try again this year, with younger leaves.

Rimmer, in general your Resnova seem to have better leaf markings that mine - you can see a good one and a not-so-good one in the attached image. I've managed to set seed on the Resnova again this year,  but I'll try a few leaf cuttings of those too.

Steve


Martin Bohnet

Sorry Steve, I guess that wet wrong: you've attached two identical images - including the filename.

Besides, I'm thinking about splitting this topic - but let's see where it moves. Personally, I've only done the classic leaf cuttings: Eucomis, Saintpaulina , Streptocarpus....
Martin (pronouns: he/his/him)