Calochortus convergence

mrobertson dr.mas.roberts@gmail.com
Sun, 03 May 2015 21:00:10 PDT


Sent from my iPhone

> On May 2, 2015, at 1:19 PM, Kipp McMichael <kimcmich@hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
> Greetings,
>  I was out last week in San Luis Obispo County, CA and visited a beach/bluff north of San Simeon where, within quite literally a 10 square foot area, 4 difference species of Calochortus grow side by side: C. albus, C. clavatus recurvifolius, C. luteus, and C. uniflorus. Sadly, these lilies do not usually bloom all together - though the former 3 overlap enough to catch them all if one times the visit right. This visit was too late for blooms of Calochortus uniflorus and too early for the other taxa  except for a single C. luteus.
>  This got me thinking concerning bulb diversity concentrations generally. At this spot, in addition to the Calochortus, there are one species each of Fritillary, Sisyrinchium, Bloomeria abd Brodaea with Dichelostemma being likely but not confirmed too. I frequently encounter bulbous taxa together - but I think this bluff is in a class by itself.
>  Or is it? Does anyone have other examples of such amazing clustering of bulbous species?
> -|<ipp                         
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