California natives-Erythronium californicum and Dichelostemia idamaia

Cody H via pbs pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
Sun, 09 Jan 2022 07:21:54 PST
That is also my experience. My E. californicum are descended from high
elevation populations, and they do their thing around the same time as many
of our local (Washington) spring wildflowers, like March-April here east of
Seattle. They seem to go dormant when the temperatures start rising above
65 regularly, which if I had to guess I would say seems to happen sooner
here in the lowlands than the plants would really prefer.

On Sun, Jan 9, 2022 at 4:38 AM Randall P. Linke via pbs <
pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:

> > My experience with E. calfornicum is that it emerged later than just
> about
> > everything else and was also one of the first to go dormant.
> >
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