Rain Lily dormancy

Mark Mazer markemazer@gmail.com
Mon, 29 Oct 2018 12:27:02 PDT
You wrote; "Habranthus tubispathus grows in the fall, winter, and spring in
its native habitat, and typically enters summer dormancy even if
watered. "

Naturalized in the lawn in a damp swale and spreading about the property
along with several other rain lilies, this is not my experience on the
coastal plain of NC.  HT reblooms from mid to late spring until early fall
here.

Mark Mazer
Hertford, NC

On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 1:32 PM David Pilling <david@davidpilling.com>
wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Post from Charles Crane (which ended up in the wrong place):
>
> With 55 species of Zephyranthes and 20+ of Habranthus growing in a
> variety of warm climates from marshes to semi-deserts, variation in
> growing season is to be expected.  Z. candida and Z. flavissima are
> evergreen and will grow throughout the year if it is not too cold or
> dry.  Habranthus tubispathus grows in the fall, winter, and spring in
> its native habitat, and typically enters summer dormancy even if
> watered.  Z. chlorosolen, Z. traubii, Z. longituba, Z. jonesii, Z.
> smallii, Z. refugiensis, and Z. pulchella all grow maximally in fall and
> spring, stay green in the winter if not frozen below about -6C (20-22F),
> and optionally go dormant in summer if it does not rain.   Z. pulchella
> in particular will flower and put up young leaves (not just extend the
> old ones) if soaked after a long dry spell in summer.  Z. drummondii and
> Z. lindleyana are also mainly fall-spring growers with frequent summer
> dormancy.  Therefore, I would encourage you to keep your Zephyranthes
> growing under lights during winter.  I keep mine in pots outside during
> the summer and bring them into a sun room (in the heated part of the
> house) when it threatens to freeze hard.
>
>      If one cheats, one can get Z. candida, Z. flavissima, H.
> tubispathus, and perhaps others to survive a temperate winter outside.
> I have some of each within 15 cm (6 in) my south-facing house
> foundation, outside a heated basement.  Two years ago, they survived a
> night of -19C (-2F) with only a dusting of snow cover.  Last winter,
> they survived the cold snap around Jan. 1, when one night was -28C
> (-19F) and one high was -20C (-4F), but I had piled about 40 cm (16 in)
> of snow over them before the severe cold arrived.  They looked ratty
> each spring, but they flowered about a month late both summers, and the
> Z. flavissima and Z. candida are expanding with offsets.  However, the
> lower temperature limit for the bulbs themselves (i.e., in pots left on
> a deck) is about -10C (12-14F).
>
>
> Charles Crane
>
> West Lafayette, Indiana (zone 5b)
>
>
> --
> David Pilling
> http://www.davidpilling.com/
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