pbs Digest, Vol 19, Issue 15

Jonathan Knisely jpsknisely@gmail.com
Fri, 14 Sep 2018 15:38:29 PDT
>
>
>
> Re: Fwd: PBS website contact:///Lycoris/ (Tony Avent)



> Can some of you who have trouble with vernalizing lycoris (e.g Lycoris
> sanguinea and any others that don't readily bloom for your 'too warm' local
> conditions) conduct an experiment for me? How about putting ice chips on
> top of the site where the lycoris bulbs are planted. It's supposed to work
> for peonies, and is a commodity readily available. It may be worth the
> effort, and the information you could provide would be of value to others.
>
> Jonathan Knisely
> New Haven, CT USDA 6a
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Hi Tony,
>
> Thank you for the excellent information. Besides watering issues, the
> primary problem with growing the spring-emerging species at lower
> elevations in Northern California is the lack of cold vernalizing
> winter temperatures. For example, with our minimum low temps only in
> the mid 20's F, in order to achieve flowering, I grow L. x squamigera
> in exposed pots that aren't exposed to winter sunlight. How do you
> rate the spring-emerging species with regard to their need for
> vernalization relative to L. x squamigera? L. chinensis and L.
> sprengeri probably need less cooling?
>
> Best regards,
> Nathan
>
>
> At 01:47 PM 9/12/2018, you wrote:
> >Hi Jane;
> >
> >Hopefully this will help.
> >
> >Based on the extensive body of DNA research, and confirmed in our
> >field trials, there are only 7 lycoris species, with 1 still tbd...a
> >far cry from the 13-20 often cited.
> >
> >Two of the lycoris species have foliage that emerges in fall, and
> >five have foliage that emerges in late winter/early spring. Because
> >all lycoris are winter-growing, the foliage emergence times
> >determines their ability to withstand winter cold. Areas with
> >extremely cold temperatures in early fall that remains so all winter
> >may actually delay foliage emergence, making the plant more winter
> >hardy than in conditions with fluctuating winter temperatures.
> >
> >Those species with fall-emerging leaves are generally winter-hardy
> >to Zone 7....some clones slightly more, some slightly less.
> >Fall foliage (zone 7)
> >Lycoris aurea
> >Lycoris radiata
> >
> >Those species with spring-emerging leaves are generally winter-hardy
> >to Zone 5, possibly colder
> >Spring Foliage (Zone 5)
> >Lycoris chinensis
> >Lycoris longituba
> >Lycoris sanguinea
> >Lycoris shaanxiensis (virtually everything in commerce is x
> >straminea) with fall foliage
> >Lycoris sprengeri
> >
> >Tbd
> >Lycoris guangxiensis
> >
> >All other lycoris are hybrids. Hybrids of two spring-leaf species
> >retains the Zone 5 hardiness, but crosses of a spring-leaf and a
> >fall-leaf species, always produces offspring with fall foliage, so
> >the hardiness of these always reverts to Zone 7. In theory, crosses
> >with two spring species and one fall species could delay leaf
> >emergence enough to increase winter hardiness.
> >
> >Lycoris Hybrids
> >Many of these names are long established, most originally published
> >as species, which DNA has shown to be hybrids. Other names are
> >unpublished and only used by us as working names for the hybrids we grow.
> >
> >Fall x Fall (Zone 7)
> >Two species hybrids
> >x albiflora (syn: L. elsiae) - aurea (fall) x radiata (fall)
> >
> >Spring x Spring (Zone 5)
> >Two species hybrids
> >x caldwellii - chinensis (spring) x longituba (spring)
> >x chejuensis - chinensis (spring) x sanguinea (spring)
> >x flavescens - chinensis (spring) x sanguinea (spring)
> >x incarnata (same as x squamigera)
> >x sprenguinea (unpublished) - sprengeri (spring) x sanguinea (spring)
> >x sprengensis (unpublished) - sprengeri (spring) x chinensis (spring)
> >x squamigera (same as elegans, incarnata) - - longituba (spring) x
> >sprengeri (spring)
> >
> >Fall x Spring (Zone 7)
> >Two species hybrids
> >x chinaurea (unpublished)- aurea (fall) x chinensis (spring)
> >x cinnabarina - aurea (fall) x sanguinea (spring)
> >x rosea (same as jacksoniana) - radiata (fall) x sprengeri (spring)
> >x sprengurea - aurea (fall x sprengeri (spring)
> >x straminea (syn: houdyshelii) - radiata (fall) x chinensis (spring)
> >x rubroaurantiaca - undetermined by DNA
> >
> >Three species hybrids (2 spring x 1 fall)
> >x longitosea (unpublished) - longituba (spring) x sprengeri (spring)
> >x radiata (fall)
> >x roseguinea (unpublished) - radiata (fall) x sprengeri (spring) x
> >sanguinea (spring)
> >x rosensis (unpublished) - radiata (fall) x sprengeri (spring) x
> >chinensis (spring)
> >
> >Three species hybrids (2 fall x 1 spring)
> >x radichinaurea (unpublished) - radiata (fall) x aurea (fall) x
> >chinensis (spring)
> >x rosaurea (unpublished) - radiata (fall) x aurea (fall) x sprengeri
> (spring)
> >
> >
> >Tony Avent
> >Proprietor
>
>
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