pbs Digest, Vol 47, Issue 11

John Baxendale via pbs pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
Tue, 12 Jan 2021 01:57:37 PST
I use lime wash to cover my greenhouse on the outside.. I only use my greenhose to give apios americana  plants and other plants an early start in spring. I am trying to get  diifferent named forms but they are very difficult to find anywhere please can anyone help me locate them. i have to respray if the lime is washed off by the rain
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Sent: 11 January 2021 03:00
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Subject: pbs Digest, Vol 47, Issue 11

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Today's Topics:

   1. Re: Greenhouse Shadecloth (Bonita Ion)
   2. Greenhouses (Chad Cox)
   3. Re: Greenhouses (The Silent Seed)
   4. Re: Greenhouses (Robert Parks)
   5. Re: Greenhouses (Nicholas Plummer)
   6. Re: Greenhouses (Arnold Trachtenberg)
   7. Greenhouses (Chad Cox)
   8. Re: Greenhouses: Remote Temperature Monitoring/Alarm
      (Shoal Creek Succulents)
   9. Re: Greenhouses (Nicholas Plummer)
  10. Re: Greenhouses (Robert Parks)
  11. Ferraria ferrariola (Arnold Trachtenberg)
  12. Re: Greenhouses: Remote Temperature Monitoring/Alarm
      (Jennifer Bailey)
  13. Now THIS is a greenhouse (Ceridwen Lloyd)
  14. Re: Now THIS is a greenhouse (Judy Glattstein)
  15. Re: Now THIS is a greenhouse (Robert Lauf)
  16. Greenhouse feedback (Luminita Vollmer)
  17. Re: Now THIS is a greenhouse (Jane McGary)
  18. Re: Now THIS is a greenhouse (Samuel)
  19. Re: Greenhouse feedback (Tim Eck)
  20. Re: Now THIS is a greenhouse (The Silent Seed)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 09:37:25 -0500
From: Bonita Ion <bonnie.ion@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouse Shadecloth
Message-ID:
        <CACwR75jnzSZX_T8Wiyc-O61nQbtMRaAfFLu2yMaPFRcEj-BwxA@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

Perhaps I haven't seen all the responses about greenhouse shading so
forgive
me if I am repeating something someone else has mentioned.

When we first built our recycled patio door greenhouse (12x15) in Michigan,
it had
a lovely view out the double-paned glass windows and I couldn't imagine
covering the
view or painting it away.  So we had a winter without protection.  That
cost several
hundred dollars for heating since we keep the temp around 50 degrees (lots
of
tropicals inside).

Looking for protection and insulation, I read about bubble wrap and decided
to try it.
Using large bubble bubble wrap, I made panels of BW to fit the glass for
each of the
25 patio doors using wide clear packing tape and then sprayed water on the
window
and placed the panel on the glass, pressing it into the window to adhere.

That was four years ago now.  The bubble wrap panels have, for the most
part, stayed
in place winter and summer (including the angled roof).  If a panel comes
loose, I
either rewet the glass and push it back on or I could make another panel
and replace it.

It has out performed my expectations.  BW did help stabilize our heating
bills (electric) and
while I miss the view out to the garden, I love the diffused light and
cosiness of the
inside.  BW is cheap and light and easy to work with.

I am really enjoying this set of discussions.  We built our greenhouse in
2013 out of recycled
double glass steel-clad patio doors (wood inside) and have loved it.
Unfortunately, the wood
inside is rotting away and we are thinking about a replacement this summer
so reading about
recommendations is very very useful and timely.  Thanks so very much for
all your comments
and suggestions......Bonnie in Ann Arbor, Michigan

On Sat, Jan 9, 2021 at 9:04 PM The Silent Seed via pbs <
pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:

> I have an AHA moment for you.
> Glue tiny pieces of velcro on the vents - and affix velcro to the cut-outs
> of cloth. EZ on, EZ off.
>
> On Sat, Jan 9, 2021 at 1:43 PM Robert Lauf via pbs <
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:
>
> > Wrens are a definite pestilence.  They get in through the floor vents
> when
> > the fan is on and then destroy the place before I can run them out.  I
> need
> > to put hardware cloth over the vents but like every other non-critical
> > thing, it keeps getting put off!
> >
> >
> > On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 01:27:54 PM EST, Judy Glattstein via pbs <
> > pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:
> >
> > Agreed, Bob. Since the majority of the roof does have shade cloth I
> > don't see the roof vents as a make-or-break issue. What would be nice
> > would be some way to screen them so the wrens stop flying in and trying
> > to nest in summer. They become shut in overnight when the roof vents
> > close, then start flying around at sun up, pooping on whatever they
> > happen to be passing over at the time and pulling down the bubble wrap..
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> > http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> > Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> >
>
>
> --
> The Silent Seed
> Rare and Unusual plants from around the world.
> thesilentseed.com
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
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>


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 06:54:14 -0800
From: Chad Cox <clcox@ucdavis.edu>
To: pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
Subject: [pbs] Greenhouses
Message-ID: <9097DDB5-9B4F-4442-A473-8B0DC3AC0D6C@ucdavis.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Bob,

I do currently have misters set up, and they work all right keeping the temperature down. But I mostly collect Hippeastrum species and other bulbs that like to be mostly dry, and I have found that the extra water on them is not appreciated. Also I have hard water and so when the misters are on it leaves a white calcium residue on the leaves of the plants below the misters. Also undesirable. I am considering a ?cooling wall? in my new greenhouse instead of misters.

Chad in Elverta CA

Sent from my iPhone
Chad L. Cox, Ph.D.

------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 10:18:24 -0500
From: The Silent Seed <tylus.seklos@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses
Message-ID:
        <CAPH75tDAE7D9QnOT_-pAoV9eWju=LLFO6LfQWpRhjR3t7Kb3XQ@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

This may be obvious to all of you hot-weather folks, but here in the
NorthEast, I have to ask; why not simply use some kind of air conditioning
unit like they use in a hotel room? Set it at 80 (or whatever) and forget
about it?
I turned a historic barn/garage into my plant house with 2 inch thick rigid
pink foam boards on the walls, and doubled up (with air space between the
layers) in the ceiling. I have not even needed to turn my heater on yet
this winter because the lights generate enough ambient heat to keep it
where it's comfortable.
I agree this is a fantastic thread.
Jude (Zone 6a; northeastern coastal Massachusetts)


On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 9:54 AM Chad Cox via pbs <
pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:

> Bob,
>
> I do currently have misters set up, and they work all right keeping the
> temperature down. But I mostly collect Hippeastrum species and other bulbs
> that like to be mostly dry, and I have found that the extra water on them
> is not appreciated. Also I have hard water and so when the misters are on
> it leaves a white calcium residue on the leaves of the plants below the
> misters. Also undesirable. I am considering a ?cooling wall? in my new
> greenhouse instead of misters.
>
> Chad in Elverta CA
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Chad L. Cox, Ph.D.
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
>


--
The Silent Seed
Rare and Unusual plants from around the world.
thesilentseed.com


------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 07:31:18 -0800
From: Robert Parks <trolleypup@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses
Message-ID:
        <CAGp9_pngd6+dSfKntRrcNzOijz_bVQ2d2bWtJ1zFqaF445aktA@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

When I was growing orchids (mostly high elevation tropicals), I had a two
stage mister...at about 70F/20C the misters would go off every hour or so,
above 85F/30C they went off much more frequently. No bad results from the
rare blazing sunny days above 100F/38C. However, lovely soft water with
very little dissolved minerals, and plants happy to have moisture on their
roots (almost all mounted rather than potted). In my new greenhouse, and
certain outdoor areas, I'm probably going to install a mist system for
extreme heat days (<5/year).

Chad, yes, some kind of swamp cooler is probably more appropriate for you.
I remember a bank of swamp coolers at a nursery back in North Carolina that
kept a massive greenhouse nearly pleasant even in the oppressive heat and
humidity. I think highly mineralized water can be a problem for swamp
coolers.

Air conditioning uses significantly more electricity than an evaporative
setup. If water is cheaper/more available, you would only be paying for the
fans. AC also tends to reduce the humidity in the cooled air.

Robert
in cool humid San Francisco, except when it isn't (2 days over 100F, 5 days
over 90F last year)

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 6:54 AM Chad Cox via pbs <
pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:

> Bob,
>
> I do currently have misters set up, and they work all right keeping the
> temperature down. But I mostly collect Hippeastrum species and other bulbs
> that like to be mostly dry, and I have found that the extra water on them
> is not appreciated. Also I have hard water and so when the misters are on
> it leaves a white calcium residue on the leaves of the plants below the
> misters. Also undesirable. I am considering a ?cooling wall? in my new
> greenhouse instead of misters.
>
> Chad in Elverta CA
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Chad L. Cox, Ph.D.
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
>


------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 11:13:25 -0500
From: Nicholas Plummer <nickplummer@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses
Message-ID: <970E51D3-0579-4F46-8AC3-8651A3BC5D9D@gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset=utf-8

I have used misters for cooling in the past but found that they left the greenhouse t?oo wet.  Since 2007, I have used a free-standing swamp cooler and have found it to work well, even in the humid southeast.  The plants stay dry, and the small opening in the greenhouse is easier to insulate in winter than a full wet-wall would be.

I have a 2-stage thermostat so that vents open first, and the cooler fan only turns on if additional cooling is required.

Here?s a link to the model I use: https://homedepot.com/p/…

Nick



------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 16:58:42 +0000 (UTC)
From: Arnold Trachtenberg <arnold140@verizon.net>
To: "pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net"
        <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses
Message-ID: <703071511.378008.1610297922165@mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Jude:
My guess to why an air conditioner is not feasible is the cost.


In some places the cost of utilities is much greater than what we pay here in the Northeast.
ArnoldNE NJ



-----Original Message-----
From: The Silent Seed via pbs <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Cc: The Silent Seed <tylus.seklos@gmail.com>
Sent: Sun, Jan 10, 2021 10:18 am
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses

This may be obvious to all of you hot-weather folks, but here in the
NorthEast, I have to ask; why not simply use some kind of air conditioning
unit like they use in a hotel room? Set it at 80 (or whatever) and forget
about it?
I turned a historic barn/garage into my plant house with 2 inch thick rigid
pink foam boards on the walls, and doubled up (with air space between the
layers) in the ceiling. I have not even needed to turn my heater on yet
this winter because the lights generate enough ambient heat to keep it
where it's comfortable.
I agree this is a fantastic thread.
Jude (Zone 6a; northeastern coastal Massachusetts)


On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 9:54 AM Chad Cox via pbs <
pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:

> Bob,
>
> I do currently have misters set up, and they work all right keeping the
> temperature down. But I mostly collect Hippeastrum species and other bulbs
> that like to be mostly dry, and I have found that the extra water on them
> is not appreciated. Also I have hard water and so when the misters are on
> it leaves a white calcium residue on the leaves of the plants below the
> misters. Also undesirable. I am considering a ?cooling wall? in my new
> greenhouse instead of misters.
>
> Chad in Elverta CA
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Chad L. Cox, Ph.D.
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
>


--
The Silent Seed
Rare and Unusual plants from around the world.
thesilentseed.com
_______________________________________________
pbs mailing list
pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>


------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 08:59:41 -0800
From: Chad Cox <clcox@ucdavis.edu>
To: pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
Subject: [pbs] Greenhouses
Message-ID: <3D242FEF-D874-4213-9D54-4DD92AC8C9B1@ucdavis.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Nick,

I couldn?t get that link to work for me, I?m not sure if that model is available at Home Depot here. Could you tell me the name of it so I could look it up and possibly get it elsewhere?

Robert and everyone else, thank you for the info, this has all been very helpful for me.


Chad in Elverta CA

Sent from my iPhone
Chad L. Cox, Ph.D.

------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 17:16:06 +0000 (UTC)
From: Shoal Creek Succulents <scs.nursery@yahoo.com>
To: Nicholas Plummer via pbs <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses: Remote Temperature Monitoring/Alarm
Message-ID: <2044052956.645174.1610298966230@mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

I don't think this portion of the topic has been discussed: temperature monitoring.?

Our GH is ~2800 square feet, double poly tunnel style.? We're in Zone 5, and winter heat minimum is set to 62F as a low for tropical plants.

We use geothermal heaters.? A geothermal heat pump exchanges heat between the ground or water source and the air to heat.? We are using the pond for the geothermal loop.? The heaters use electricity, and also have the capability to use propane.
One of the temp monitoring systems we use is a T&D WIFI Temp Logger.? It can send emails or an audible alert.? I've included a screen shot of some random data.

It's been extremely useful when trying to determine a problem.?

Because our internet is sometimes sketchy, we also have a secondary alarm system.? I have 2 sensors on the GH, one at the back end (120' away from the house) and one in the front.? The main station is upstairs in the house where the system has line of sight to the 2 sensors.? It will beep if the temperature gets too low.?

I would also like to figure out some smart device to connect to my Amazon Echo device, so I can ask Alexa to verify the temperature.? I haven't figured out how to accomplish yet.? Something like in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey.? "Dave, we have a problem....".?

I would be interested to hear what others are using.
LisaShoal Creek Succulents










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Message: 9
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 12:27:08 -0500
From: Nicholas Plummer <nickplummer@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses
Message-ID: <B7C6B2A6-B23F-48C2-8761-DD706BFA0ED0@gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset=utf-8

Sorry about that.  Googling ?Frigiking 3500 CFM 2-Speed Front Discharge Window Evaporative Cooler? should turn it up.  There other models of Frigiking coolers available, too?different sizes, and front-discharge vs ducted.

They can also be purchased from https://www.greenhousemegastore.com/ but Home Depot was cheaper.

Home Depot doesn?t market them in this part of the country, but I was able to mail order it through them and they delivered it to the house. I?m currently on my second one. I replaced the first one because a tree dropped on it, and where the frame was bent it started to rust out.  In the absence of falling trees, it seems to be very reliable and long lasting.

Nick


> On Jan 10, 2021, at 11:59 AM, Chad Cox via pbs <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:
>
> ?Nick,
>
> I couldn?t get that link to work for me, I?m not sure if that model is available at Home Depot here. Could you tell me the name of it so I could look it up and possibly get it elsewhere?
>
> Robert and everyone else, thank you for the info, this has all been very helpful for me.
>
>
> Chad in Elverta CA
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Chad L. Cox, Ph.D.
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>


------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 09:49:35 -0800
From: Robert Parks <trolleypup@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses
Message-ID:
        <CAGp9_pnm651sEHGs4dqLzwkh-K+8KVOY+VkG3Msw3-Z0Rw1qgw@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

Ah, my orchid misters were installed in a open sided shelter or entirely
exposed, so no enclosed dampness.

Robert

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 9:27 AM Nicholas Plummer via pbs <
pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:

> Sorry about that.  Googling ?Frigiking 3500 CFM 2-Speed Front Discharge
> Window Evaporative Cooler? should turn it up.  There other models of
> Frigiking coolers available, too?different sizes, and front-discharge vs
> ducted.
>
> They can also be purchased from https://www.greenhousemegastore.com/ but
> Home Depot was cheaper.
>
> Home Depot doesn?t market them in this part of the country, but I was able
> to mail order it through them and they delivered it to the house. I?m
> currently on my second one. I replaced the first one because a tree dropped
> on it, and where the frame was bent it started to rust out.  In the absence
> of falling trees, it seems to be very reliable and long lasting.
>
> Nick
>
>
> > On Jan 10, 2021, at 11:59 AM, Chad Cox via pbs <
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:
> >
> > ?Nick,
> >
> > I couldn?t get that link to work for me, I?m not sure if that model is
> available at Home Depot here. Could you tell me the name of it so I could
> look it up and possibly get it elsewhere?
> >
> > Robert and everyone else, thank you for the info, this has all been very
> helpful for me.
> >
> >
> > Chad in Elverta CA
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> > Chad L. Cox, Ph.D.
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> > http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> > Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
>


------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 20:12:17 +0000 (UTC)
From: Arnold Trachtenberg <arnold140@verizon.net>
To: "pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net"
        <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: [pbs] Ferraria ferrariola
Message-ID: <1749705140.446169.1610309538006@mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Flowering now.
Arnold
New Jersey
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Message: 12
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 14:17:40 -0800
From: Jennifer Bailey <beanielad@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouses: Remote Temperature Monitoring/Alarm
Message-ID:
        <CAA=VBY7-5=P=xGRNd3evVZxmscP9+9AXnAB5_kfH-Txj5j4SZw@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

We use a weather station from Ambient and have remote sensors in the
greenhouse and other places. It can send email alerts. You can also
monitor the complete history of it online. I am not sure of the range
of their sensors, but they send temp and humidity information. They
are meant to be coming out with soil moisture sensors as well, but I
think they are having problems with them.
Jenny

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 9:16 AM Shoal Creek Succulents via pbs
<pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:
>
> I don't think this portion of the topic has been discussed: temperature monitoring.
>
> Our GH is ~2800 square feet, double poly tunnel style.  We're in Zone 5, and winter heat minimum is set to 62F as a low for tropical plants.
>
> We use geothermal heaters.  A geothermal heat pump exchanges heat between the ground or water source and the air to heat.  We are using the pond for the geothermal loop.  The heaters use electricity, and also have the capability to use propane.
> One of the temp monitoring systems we use is a T&D WIFI Temp Logger.  It can send emails or an audible alert.  I've included a screen shot of some random data.
>
> It's been extremely useful when trying to determine a problem.
>
> Because our internet is sometimes sketchy, we also have a secondary alarm system.  I have 2 sensors on the GH, one at the back end (120' away from the house) and one in the front.  The main station is upstairs in the house where the system has line of sight to the 2 sensors.  It will beep if the temperature gets too low.
>
> I would also like to figure out some smart device to connect to my Amazon Echo device, so I can ask Alexa to verify the temperature.  I haven't figured out how to accomplish yet.  Something like in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey.  "Dave, we have a problem....".
>
> I would be interested to hear what others are using.
> LisaShoal Creek Succulents
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>



--
Find out more about our garden at http://oceansidegarden.com/


------------------------------

Message: 13
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2021 08:55:26 +1030
From: Ceridwen Lloyd <ceridwen@internode.on.net>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: [pbs] Now THIS is a greenhouse
Message-ID: <F34EFA97-2B67-426C-95B7-B299A9C99C6F@internode.on.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

This is the alpine house at Sakura Konohana Kan in Osaka.
It was blistering hot and humid outside, but chilly in here (brute force air conditioning I think)
A bit beyond my budget to reproduce, alas!

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Message: 14
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 17:31:53 -0500
From: Judy Glattstein <jgglatt@gmail.com>
To: pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
Subject: Re: [pbs] Now THIS is a greenhouse
Message-ID: <b1fcc8e0-474d-8674-fe7b-006be1487b7d@gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed

I believe the alpine house at Kew, in the UK, has refrigerated pipes in
the ground as well as air conditioning.

Lee Raden, once upon a time president of NARGS, had an air conditioned
alpine house before there was air conditioning installed for his house /
home.

On 1/10/2021 5:25 PM, Ceridwen Lloyd via pbs wrote:
> This is the alpine house at Sakura Konohana Kan in Osaka.
> It was blistering hot and humid outside, but chilly in here (brute force air conditioning I think)
> A bit beyond my budget to reproduce, alas!
>
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>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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Message: 15
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 22:39:46 +0000 (UTC)
From: Robert Lauf <boblauf@att.net>
To: Ceridwen Lloyd via pbs <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Now THIS is a greenhouse
Message-ID: <778213042.482887.1610318386551@mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Amazing what you can do when money is no object.? The Germans who were big in hybridizing cool-growing orchids had large "cool houses" to keep them happy.

Many years ago, amid acres of cattleyas, Hausermann's in Chicago had a little space devoted to cloud-forest species, with cooling and misters going all the time in summer.? Luckily most of those orchids are small to tiny, so you could host a reasonably good assortment? on your kitchen table.

Bob









------------------------------

Message: 16
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 18:50:57 -0600
From: Luminita Vollmer <pbslv.xchange@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: [pbs] Greenhouse feedback
Message-ID:
        <CALXf-BKdB0zi+8cpT2bcp8V7Gf43GCCsTzegD8zpZhbz8mArVQ@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

Dear all

Thank you to all that wrote re: the greenhouse subject: invaluable tips,
experience hacks and just awesome stories. I think I will compile all of
that in a handbook or a cheat sheet! Outstanding advice, tips, innovative
ways to look at the problem, just awesome! I definitely was not expecting
such a response!

I live in MN - and for a gardener in this area - everything is so much
different than for most gardeners. Even the length of the growing season is
different, let alone the conditions. I look to the Canadian friends, and
use a lot of Zone 1-2 techniques, but my heart goes towards EVERYTHING,
 and many of the plants come from many other zones, plants that need to
come indoors during the winter.

At this point the reality is that my decision starts like the song: Should
 I Go or Should I Stay! Either direction will include a greenhouse. My city
currently does not allow any greenhouse that through its size could imply
commercial agriculture. For this  reason alone I will have to move to a
different city.

And then the music starts - stay here or move to warmer climate.
It will be an adventure, most certainly. And I am looking forward to having
a greenhouse, the most important aspect.

Apologies for all that had other questions or subjects to write about.
Thank you to all, I will be back with questions!

Luminita
MN at the moment, snow and cold


------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 18:19:25 -0800
From: Jane McGary <janemcgary@earthlink.net>
To: pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
Subject: Re: [pbs] Now THIS is a greenhouse
Message-ID: <7826ed8b-6eab-9311-536d-4bf20909236c@earthlink.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed

You want an air-conditioned greenhouse? Years ago, and I think it was in
the botanical garden at Christchurch, New Zealand (someone correct me if
I'm misremembering), I visited a Subantarctic House, which had been
designed to replicate and display some remarkable and mostly quite large
plants from the subantarctic islands. It was a dome, with a boardwalk
which zig-zagged around inside. The walls were painted with scenes of
the islands, and the plants installed in beds in front of the scenes,
quite realistically. It was very cold, and huge fans blew at a rate
imitating the Roaring Forties. The plants looked great and many were in
flower. A great way to see this amazing flora without dying of seasickness!

Jane McGary, Portland, Oregon, USA




------------------------------

Message: 18
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2021 12:53:07 +1000
From: Samuel <bgjulian@iinet.net.au>
To: pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
Subject: Re: [pbs] Now THIS is a greenhouse
Message-ID: <cb92f350-24de-f552-bd10-c731f33fc2da@iinet.net.au>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed

There is a Subantarctic cold house in Hobart , Tasmania , Australia , we
visited there when living in Tasmania , amazing to see plants in a
replicated house , quite cold with the fans working.

Gordon Julian , Highfields , Queensland.

On 11/01/2021 12:19 pm, Jane McGary via pbs wrote:
> You want an air-conditioned greenhouse? Years ago, and I think it was
> in the botanical garden at Christchurch, New Zealand (someone correct
> me if I'm misremembering), I visited a Subantarctic House, which had
> been designed to replicate and display some remarkable and mostly
> quite large plants from the subantarctic islands. It was a dome, with
> a boardwalk which zig-zagged around inside. The walls were painted
> with scenes of the islands, and the plants installed in beds in front
> of the scenes, quite realistically. It was very cold, and huge fans
> blew at a rate imitating the Roaring Forties. The plants looked great
> and many were in flower. A great way to see this amazing flora without
> dying of seasickness!
>
> Jane McGary, Portland, Oregon, USA
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>


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Message: 19
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 21:58:30 -0500
From: Tim Eck <timeck17582@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Greenhouse feedback
Message-ID:
        <CA+ur5iYS_EAD-RLNUU+EZzHo1ghfiYDWGG=p7yDXTJt3BaKQEw@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

Luminita,
It seems like you might want to research this more since your heating
requirements are so extreme (unless you're independently wealthy).
For instance, you might want to look up the guy who grows oranges in
Nebraska with solar heating.  And you might want to check out other zoning
classes that permit agriculture before you decide where to move.  Some do
not tax high tunnel type greenhouses.  Also, check out high efficiency gas
heaters that recapture the latent heat of the water vapor.  They generally
don't have a chimney but use schedule 40 plastic drain pipe instead.  The
ones that vent directly into the greenhouse can raise the humidity too much
but a lot of people use them.
A lot depends on what you are willing to compromise on.  For instance, most
commercial growers orient their houses with the gables North South for even
illumination but you might consider an East West orientation wooden A-frame
with the North wall opaque and insulated.  This would cut your heating in
half with very little change in winter illumination.  Also, using the
inflation technique used on double wall plastic houses and adding a third
layer on the inside with battens, you would get an R-2.5 insulation value
on the south side.
If you don't want to compromise design, you could save half your heating
costs with a simple layer of white or reflective plastic pulled over the
plants at night to reduce the radiant heat loss which I assume is extreme
in your area due to clear nights.  Radiant heat loss is the reason you can
get a killing frost outside when the ambient temperature is 40F.
Good Luck
Tim


------------------------------

Message: 20
Date: Sun, 10 Jan 2021 21:59:25 -0500
From: The Silent Seed <tylus.seklos@gmail.com>
To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
Subject: Re: [pbs] Now THIS is a greenhouse
Message-ID:
        <CAPH75tCwi+-quA5b+FVFND8eFJn+23FN5KeWX+a2Sz4YzouMzQ@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

This sounds amazing! What kind of plants were displayed?

On Sun, Jan 10, 2021 at 9:53 PM Samuel via pbs <
pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> wrote:

> There is a Subantarctic cold house in Hobart , Tasmania , Australia , we
> visited there when living in Tasmania , amazing to see plants in a
> replicated house , quite cold with the fans working.
>
> Gordon Julian , Highfields , Queensland.
>
> On 11/01/2021 12:19 pm, Jane McGary via pbs wrote:
> > You want an air-conditioned greenhouse? Years ago, and I think it was
> > in the botanical garden at Christchurch, New Zealand (someone correct
> > me if I'm misremembering), I visited a Subantarctic House, which had
> > been designed to replicate and display some remarkable and mostly
> > quite large plants from the subantarctic islands. It was a dome, with
> > a boardwalk which zig-zagged around inside. The walls were painted
> > with scenes of the islands, and the plants installed in beds in front
> > of the scenes, quite realistically. It was very cold, and huge fans
> > blew at a rate imitating the Roaring Forties. The plants looked great
> > and many were in flower. A great way to see this amazing flora without
> > dying of seasickness!
> >
> > Jane McGary, Portland, Oregon, USA
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> > http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> > Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:pbs-unsubscribe@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
>


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Rare and Unusual plants from around the world.
thesilentseed.com


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