Geophytes

mark akimoff makimoff76@gmail.com
Fri, 08 Feb 2019 13:34:36 PST
Thanks everyone for the great brainstorming on the evolution of geophytes,
soil types, presence or absence of toxic compounds, grazing pressure,
digging and burrowing animals, environmental changes, etc. etc. all of
these will make a great presentation topic and a way to introduce
evolutionary adaptations to students in a STEM curriculum.

Mark

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 1:21 PM GEORGE STEWART <george_stewart@bigpond.com>
wrote:

> An old but useful book is   Tuberous Cormous Bulbs
>
> by John Pate and Kingsley Dixon;
>
> publisher:///UWA/ Publishing, 1982
>
> It covers Western Australian species but most of the information can be
> generalised to species from other parts of the world.
>
> George Stewart
>
> ------ Original Message ------
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> Sent: Friday, 8 Feb, 2019 At 8:42 AM
> Subject: pbs Digest, Vol 24, Issue 6
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> Today's Topics:
>
>     1. Evolution of geophytes? (mark akimoff)
>     2. Re: Evolution of geophytes? (Giant Coreopsis)
>     3. Re: Evolution of geophytes? (mark akimoff)
>     4. Re: Evolution of geophytes? (Jane McGary)
>     5. Re: Evolution of geophytes? (Tom Elias)
>     6. Re: Evolution of geophytes? (Jim McKenney)
>     7. Asarum canadense sun tolerance (Dennis Kramb)
>     8. Small World (Judy Glattstein)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2019 09:28:45 -0800
> From: mark akimoff <makimoff76@gmail.com>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> Subject: [pbs] Evolution of geophytes?
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CAGOPR+cG++RiV_bW4YFzpTuGkht2s_GXM2ihOJx6C032GXp+oA@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Hello,
>
> I'm wanting to put together an introductory power point on the evolution
> of
> geophytes to be used in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math)
> outreach at local schools. I'm interested in the story telling aspect of
> it, and Martyn Rix' "Growing Bulbs" has a great introductory chapter on
> the
> evolution of flowers that covers things like the Crocus, and
> subterranean
> ovaries as an adaptation to grazing pressure. Or for instance, fall
> blooming speciation as an adaptation to  seasonal migration of grazing
> herds across elevational gradients.
>
> Beyond that book does anyone have any other books, articles, ideas,
> theories, etc? That might be useful in introducing evolution of
> geophytes
> as a curriculum? I'm leaning towards tying it in to current issues like
> zeric adaptations for changing climate or pollution tolerance, that sort
> of
> thing.
>
> Any help from this brain trust would be much appreciated!
>
> Thanks,
> Mark Akimoff
> illahe
> Salem, Oregon
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2019 10:26:04 -0800
> From: Giant Coreopsis <giantcoreopsis@gmail.com>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Evolution of geophytes?
> Message-ID: <D84A07E6-2956-4EC0-87B5-EEABB3015F64@gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset=utf-8
>
> I have a slim-ish volume called ?The evolution of plants? by Willis and
> McElwain. I can send you snapshots of the table of contents / index in a
> private message if you?re interested.
>
> On Feb 7, 2019, at 9:28 AM, mark akimoff <makimoff76@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> I'm wanting to put together an introductory power point on the evolution
> of
> geophytes to be used in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math)
> outreach at local schools. I'm interested in the story telling aspect of
> it, and Martyn Rix' "Growing Bulbs" has a great introductory chapter on
> the
> evolution of flowers that covers things like the Crocus, and
> subterranean
> ovaries as an adaptation to grazing pressure. Or for instance, fall
> blooming speciation as an adaptation to  seasonal migration of grazing
> herds across elevational gradients.
>
> Beyond that book does anyone have any other books, articles, ideas,
> theories, etc? That might be useful in introducing evolution of
> geophytes
> as a curriculum? I'm leaning towards tying it in to current issues like
> zeric adaptations for changing climate or pollution tolerance, that sort
> of
> thing.
>
> Any help from this brain trust would be much appreciated!
>
> Thanks,
> Mark Akimoff
> illahe
> Salem, Oregon
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2019 10:30:25 -0800
> From: mark akimoff <makimoff76@gmail.com>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Evolution of geophytes?
> Message-ID:
>         <
> CAGOPR+dSJDuRuxQNLnPHez_bboVqnqd-MUtB3+d-dOMgMOEyhg@mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Thanks,
>
> That would be great! I'm gathering all resources!
>
> Mark
>
> On Thu, Feb 7, 2019 at 10:26 AM Giant Coreopsis
> <giantcoreopsis@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > I have a slim-ish volume called ?The evolution of plants? by Willis
> > and
> > McElwain. I can send you snapshots of the table of contents / index in
> > a
> > private message if you?re interested.
> >
> > On Feb 7, 2019, at 9:28 AM, mark akimoff <makimoff76@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Hello,
> >
> > I'm wanting to put together an introductory power point on the
> > evolution of
> > geophytes to be used in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math)
> > outreach at local schools. I'm interested in the story telling aspect
> > of
> > it, and Martyn Rix' "Growing Bulbs" has a great introductory chapter
> > on the
> > evolution of flowers that covers things like the Crocus, and
> > subterranean
> > ovaries as an adaptation to grazing pressure. Or for instance, fall
> > blooming speciation as an adaptation to  seasonal migration of grazing
> > herds across elevational gradients.
> >
> > Beyond that book does anyone have any other books, articles, ideas,
> > theories, etc? That might be useful in introducing evolution of
> > geophytes
> > as a curriculum? I'm leaning towards tying it in to current issues
> > like
> > zeric adaptations for changing climate or pollution tolerance, that
> > sort of
> > thing.
> >
> > Any help from this brain trust would be much appreciated!
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Mark Akimoff
> > illahe
> > Salem, Oregon
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> > http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> > http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2019 11:09:55 -0800
> From: Jane McGary <janemcgary@earthlink.net>
> To: pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Evolution of geophytes?
> Message-ID: <ba1fe838-b17a-fa43-0cf6-a8bc2b50fe97@earthlink.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
> The ways in which bulbs multiply often seem to be adaptations to
> environmental conditions. For instance, the production of numerous tiny,
> loosely attached offsets (such as "rice grains" in some Fritillaria) is
> often associated with predation by digging animals such as bears and
> humans (e.g., consumers of Fritillaria camtschatcensis, Brodiaea
> californica, Camassia). The interesting bulb of Lilium pardalinum, which
> is elongated with very numerous scales, may reflect its typical habitat
> near mountain streams, where the bulb might be dislodged and distributed
> in spring. In both cases, the forms that bore many viable bulblets or
> scales would tend over time to dominate the population.
>
> Mark mentions Crocus and its subterranean ovary. You can tell when
> crocuses are ready to have their seed harvested because the capsule
> rather suddenly rises above soil level on a stem, so that the seeds will
> scatter. In nature one usually sees crocuses growing as scattered
> individuals, not the tight clonal clusters found in cultivation --
> perhaps a respnse to burrowing predators.
>
> Jane McGary, Portland, Oregon, USAOn 2/7/2019 10:30 AM, mark akimoff
> wrote:
>
> > On Feb 7, 2019, at 9:28 AM, mark akimoff <makimoff76@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> Hello,
> >>
> >> I'm wanting to put together an introductory power point on the
> >> evolution of
> >> geophytes to be used in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and
> >> Math)
> >> outreach at local schools. I'm interested in the story telling aspect
> >> of
> >> it, and Martyn Rix' "Growing Bulbs" has a great introductory chapter
> >> on the
> >> evolution of flowers that covers things like the Crocus, and
> >> subterranean
> >> ovaries as an adaptation to grazing pressure. Or for instance, fall
> >> blooming speciation as an adaptation to  seasonal migration of
> >> grazing
> >> herds across elevational gradients.
> >>
> >> Beyond that book does anyone have any other books, articles, ideas,
> >> theories, etc? That might be useful in introducing evolution of
> >> geophytes
> >> as a curriculum? I'm leaning towards tying it in to current issues
> >> like
> >> zeric adaptations for changing climate or pollution tolerance, that
> >> sort of
> >> thing.
> >>
> >> Any help from this brain trust would be much appreciated!
> >>
> >> Thanks,
> >> Mark Akimoff
> >> illahe
> >> Salem, Oregon
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> pbs mailing list
> >> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> >> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> pbs mailing list
> >> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> >> http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
> >>
> > _______________________________________________
> > pbs mailing list
> > pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> > http://lists.pacificbulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/…
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2019 19:16:55 +0000
> From: Tom Elias <tselias@msn.com>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Evolution of geophytes?
> Message-ID:
>
> <
> BYAPR07MB6135B0157CD64F2D906133DAB0680@BYAPR07MB6135.namprd07.prod.outlook.com
> >
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Mark:
>     You may also want to investigate the presence of toxic secondary
> compounds such as alkaloids in geophytes.  I know for example that
> Irises are abundant in the extensive steppes of Siberia.  This is a
> major location for the evolution of large herbivores.   Tulips are also
> found here along with other bulbous plants.  I know that Irises are
> loaded with alkaloids and poisonous to gracing animals.  But, I do not
> know about the toxicity of Tulips and other bulbous plants found there.
> This is one of several mechanisms that plants have developed to
> successfully compete and survive.
>
> Tom
>
> ________________________________
> From: pbs <pbs-bounces@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net> on behalf of mark
> akimoff <makimoff76@gmail.com>
> Sent: Thursday, February 7, 2019 9:28 AM
> To: Pacific Bulb Society
> Subject: [pbs] Evolution of geophytes?
>
> Hello,
>
> I'm wanting to put together an introductory power point on the evolution
> of
> geophytes to be used in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math)
> outreach at local schools. I'm interested in the story telling aspect of
> it, and Martyn Rix' "Growing Bulbs" has a great introductory chapter on
> the
> evolution of flowers that covers things like the Crocus, and
> subterranean
> ovaries as an adaptation to grazing pressure. Or for instance, fall
> blooming speciation as an adaptation to  seasonal migration of grazing
> herds across elevational gradients.
>
> Beyond that book does anyone have any other books, articles, ideas,
> theories, etc? That might be useful in introducing evolution of
> geophytes
> as a curriculum? I'm leaning towards tying it in to current issues like
> zeric adaptations for changing climate or pollution tolerance, that sort
> of
> thing.
>
> Any help from this brain trust would be much appreciated!
>
> Thanks,
> Mark Akimoff
> illahe
> Salem, Oregon
> _______________________________________________
> pbs mailing list
> pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
>
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com//…
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2019 20:29:35 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Jim McKenney <jamesamckenney@verizon.net>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> Subject: Re: [pbs] Evolution of geophytes?
> Message-ID: <183874394.4843201.1549571375389@mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
>   Note that the ovaries of most (or all?) colchicums and crocuses are
> underground at bloom time and in colchicums the ovary is raised up above
> the surface within the foliage as it develops. In most crocuses, the
> seed capsule is pushed up out of the ground when the seeds are
> ripe.?Among crocuses, Crocus korolkowii produces seed capsules which
> remain underground.?Jim McKenneyMontgomery County, Maryland, USA, USDA
> zone 7, where the first of the late winter crocuses might appear any day
> now.?
>     http://bulbsociety.net/cgi-bin/mailman/…
>
>
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> ------------------------------
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> Message: 7
> Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 15:49:02 -0500
> From: Dennis Kramb <dkramb@badbear.com>
> To: Pacific Bulb Society <pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> Subject: [pbs] Asarum canadense sun tolerance
> Message-ID:
>         <mailman.27.1549572547.519.pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> Near my property line I have cultivated a lovely and large patch of
> Asarum canadense in the shade of my neighbors pine trees.? The first
> plants originally appeared all on their own about twenty years ago.?
> New neighbors have seen fit to chop all those trees down last week (at
> the peak of the polar vortex no less). So now the plants are in full
> sun.
> Is a shade screen necessary for them to survive?
> Dennis in Cincinnati
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2019 16:42:16 -0500
> From: Judy Glattstein <jgglatt@gmail.com>
> To: pbs@lists.pacificbulbsociety.net
> Subject: [pbs] Small World
> Message-ID: <9590ddc9-8940-a53f-b289-62346413a9c6@gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"; Format="flowed"
>
> The small world and making connections.
>
> I looked up walipini. The entry mentioned that the term refers to an
> earth-sheltered cold frame. It derives its name from the Aymaran
> languages.
>
> My brother did his doctoral research in the Peruvian Andes lo these many
> years ago. He learned both Quechua and Aymara languages. So of course I
> asked him about this.
>
> His reply:
> "Wali- is an Aymara root that means 'good.' Waliskiw means, things are
> good. Not sure about the -pini suffix. The cab driver that my brother
> and his wife had back from JFK was a Bolivian, grew up with
> Quechua-speaking parents, still knows it. He said he'd never had a
> Quechua-speaking customer before in his 35 years of driving. "
>
> Where were they coming back from? He had been at a conference in Durban.
> His wife came along. After the conference they took a long week in Cape
> Town, went to Kirstenbosh, up Table Mountain, etc. Most of the pictures
> he sent to me (taken with his iPhone) are not of interest to me and you.
> Here are three that make the cut. I'm pretty sure about the scadoxus.
> And is watsonia correct?
>
> Judy in NJ where the living history farm is scheduled to start tapping
> sugar maples this Saturday. And I've seen two different flocks of
> robins.
>
>
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