Allium sibthorpianum

Allium sibthorpianum is a gem among many fantastic species native to Turkey. It's a tiny, clustering, rock garden sort that's ideal in troughs, well drained containers, or sand beds out in the garden. The key here is excellent drainage. This species looks something like Allium flavum ssp. tauricum and A. paniculatum in the shape and disposition of the little dangled bell florets, and several other diagnostic characteristics shared by this group of allied species. The flowers appear in June, the clusters of silvery pink bells are held atop chunky stems only 2"-3" (5-8 cm). As the flowers age, the florets deepen to a raspberry rose color and turn upright. I believe that this species hybridizes with Allium flavum ssp. tauricum, giving rise to dwarf, earlier flowering progeny. In the bud stage, it's intriguing how the buds appear as contorted prostrate snakes! In the final view of Alliums growing in a trough, we see Allium sibthorpianum and a couple of pale-flowered forms of Allium flavum ssp. tauricum. Photos 1-5 by Mark McDonough. Photo #6 was taken by Arnold Trachtenberg of a pot grown from NARGS seed in 2000.

Allium sibthorpianum, Mark McDonoughAllium sibthorpianum, Mark McDonoughAllium sibthorpianum, Mark McDonoughAllium sibthorpianum, Mark McDonoughAllium sibthorpianum and Allium flavum ssp. tauricum, Mark McDonoughAllium sibthorpianum, Arnold Trachtenberg

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Page last modified on July 06, 2015, at 05:57 AM