Hippeastrum Species One

Hippeastrum is a genus in the family Amaryllidaceae with 70-75 species and 600+ hybrids and cultivars. The genus is native to tropical regions of the Caribbean, Mexico and South America. The Hippeastrum main page has information about cultivation and lists the species and hybrids that are included in the PBS wiki.

This page contains Hippeastrum species A-O. Other species are found on the Hippeastrum species P-Z page.


Hippeastrum aglaiae is a rainforest species from northern Argentina with orange, cream or pink flowers. Photograph by Germán Roitman

Hippeastrum aglaiae, Germán Roitman

Hippeastrum angustifolium is a bog species from northern Argentina with big and spectacular flowers. Photograph by Germán Roitman.

Hippeastrum angustifolium, Germán Roitman

Hippeastrum argentinum (syn. Hippeastrum tucumanum) is native to Tucuman, Catamarca, and Salta, northwestern Argentina. It is one of the white trumpet species that are commonly known as "azucenas" or "lilies". It has long strap-shaped, and mostly pure white tepals. There is a form with pinkish reflexes and is described by Piero Ravenna as H. argentinum forma rosea. In habitat, plants receive rain from December-March (part of spring and summer). Dormancy takes place during part of autumn, winter, and part of spring. Photos by Doug Westfall.

Hippeastrum argentinum, Doug WestfallHippeastrum argentinum, Doug Westfall

Hippeastrum aulicum see the Hippeastrum aulicum page.

Representative photos of this species. Photo 1 was taken by Lee Poulsen, photo 2 by Doug Westfall, photo 3 by Angelo Porcelli, and photos 4-6 by Tarcísio Eduardo Raduenz.

Hippeastrum aulicum, Lee PoulsenHippeastrum aulicum, Doug WestfallHippeastrum aulicum vs. Biritibi, Angelo PorcelliHippeastrum aulicum, Tarcísio Eduardo RaduenzHippeastrum aulicum, Tarcísio Eduardo RaduenzHippeastrum aulicum, Tarcísio Eduardo Raduenz

Hippeastrum blossfeldiae is native to São Paulo State, Brazil. Bulbs grow on sand banks along the coast. In cultivation this species likes full sun during the growing season and a dry winter rest. During winter rest the plant may stay evergreen. The photos below were taken by Nhu Nguyen.

Hippeastrum blossfeldiae, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum blossfeldiae, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum blossfeldiae, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum blossfeldiae, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum blossfeldiae, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum blossfeldiae, Nhu Nguyen

Hippeastrum bukasovii is endemic to areas at 1400–1800 m (4600-6000 ft), in heavy forest mulch at the bottom of steep canyons and valleys in Sandia Province in the Department of Puno, eastern Peru. In this native habitat of the Andes, the days are warmish with cool nights. The climate is mild year-round with rainfall mostly spring and summer. Bulbs blooms in September (spring) in habitat. This species can be difficult in cultivation because of the temperature requirements. The species produces large bulbs and leaves and appreciate good water and fertilizer during the growing season. During winter, they should be watered only sparingly around the bulbs as any water that gets into the crown can rot the bulbs. Photo 1 was taken by Doug Westfall in March. Photos 2-3 were taken by Jacob Uluwehi Knecht of a different seed-grown form.

Hippeastrum bukasovii, Doug WestfallHippeastrum bukasovii, Jacob Uluwehi KnechtHippeastrum bukasovii, Jacob Uluwehi Knecht

Hippeastrum calyptratum see the Hippeastrum calyptratum page. Representative photos of this species. Photo 1 was taken by Digby Boswell, photos 2-3 were by Johannes-Ulrich Urban, photos 4-5 were by Nhu Nguyen, photo 6 was by Jacob Uluwehi Knecht.

Hippeastrum calyptratum, Digby BoswellHippeastrum calyptratum, Johannes-Ulrich UrbanHippeastrum calyptratum, Johannes-Ulrich UrbanHippeastrum calyptratum, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum calyptratum, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum calyptratum, Jacob Uluwehi Knecht

Hippeastrum correiense. I got this from a large Japanese bulb company (Komoriya), and was told it was Hippeastrum coliense. I can't find a picture of it on the web anywhere, and when it bloomed, at first I didn't think it looked like the picture in the catalog. But then I realized that the front-on view looked the same and I just didn't know it had such a long trumpet and that this is as wide as it opens. The scape is about 2/3 of a meter tall. Photo taken March 2004 by Lee Poulsen.

Hippeastrum correiense, Lee PoulsenHippeastrum correiense, Lee PoulsenHippeastrum correiense, Lee Poulsen

Hippeastrum cybister is native to Bolivia and Argentina and is often mentioned in the literature, but is found in few collections. In habitat, plants receive rain from December-March (part of spring and summer). Dormancy takes place during part of autumn, winter, and part of spring. The stem on this first bloom is 19 inches tall. Doug Westfall says, "I think that it may be my favorite Hippeastrum". Pictures 1, 2 by Doug Westfall, 3 by Jamie Vande of a cultivar that is commonly available in Germany (may be a named clone) 4, 5 of floral colour patterns by Jacob Uluwehi Knecht.

Hippeastrum cybister, Doug WestfallHippeastrum cybister, Doug WestfallHippeastrum cybister, Jamie VandeHippeastrum cybister, Jacob Uluwehi KnechtHippeastrum cybister top tepal backside, Jacob Uluwehi Knecht

Hippeastrum "euryphyllum" (syn. Amaryllis euryphylla Ravenna 2003) cannot be found as a validly published name in major plant taxonomic databases. However, it is pretty clear that the plant is a Hippeastrum so we are including it here. The species falls within the subgenus Macropodastrum (white flowers with long tubes). In Argentina three other species of this subgenus are recorded: H. argentinum (syn. H. tucumanum, H. candidum, H. immaculatum), H. parodii and H. guarapuavicum. Hippeastrum euryphyllum can be distinguished from the others by the light yellow-creamy trumpet shaped flowers, the very short style arms, as well as the area where it grows among rocks in rocky slopes in the three hills that gave the name to the Tres Cerros hamlet, Department of San Martin, Province of Corrientes. The species also has the broad, comparatively short leaves. Photos 1-3 were taken in northern Argentina by Germán Roitman. Photos 4-6 were contributed by Mariano Saviello of plants from a different site in situ.

Hippeastrum euryphylla, Germán RoitmanHippeastrum euryphylla, Germán RoitmanHippeastrum euryphylla, Germán RoitmanHippeastrum euryphylla, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum euryphylla, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum euryphylla, Mariano Saviello

The photos below were taken by Mariano Saviello of cultivated plants.

Hippeastrum euryphylla, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum euryphylla, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum euryphylla, Mariano Saviello

Hippeastrum evansiae is a species that is now rare because its previous habitats are now being used for agriculture. It grows in hot dry forests and prefers a dry warm winter. While not uncommon in collections, H. evansiae is not seen too often. It is one of the smaller of the species, but it is well worth a place in any bulb collection. This species needs a winter dormancy in order to bloom. The first 2 pictures were taken by Doug Westfall in Southern California and the third by Bob Rutemoeller shows plants blooming in Harry Hay's gardens in May 2004. Photos 3-6 were taken by Nhu Nguyen.

Hippeastrum evansiae, Doug WestfallHippeastrum evansiae, Doug WestfallHippeastrum evansiae, Bob RutemoellerHippeastrum evansiae, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum evansiae, Nhu NguyenHippeastrum evansiae, Nhu Nguyen

Hippeastrum glaucescens is said to be a synonym or a very allied species of Hippeastrum teyucuarense. It is a winter deciduous, very variable species with glaucous leaves native to Brazil, where is known as 'Lirio Do Mato' (Lily of the Mato, referring the Matto Grosso). It is native to biomes of Caatinga, Cerrado and Mata Atlântica in the states of Bahia (North-East Brazil), Goiás, Distrito Federal, Mato Grosso do Sul (Center-West Brazil), Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro (South-East Brazil) and Paraná and Santa Catarina (Southern Brazil). A recent study by Daviña et al. stated that important similarities exists between this species and H. iguazuanum and H. teyucuarense. It can be grown as a pot plant under full sun. In cultivation (Argentina/Brazil) it flowers in early spring (September-October) and the tepals, unlike H. teyucuarense, tends to fold inwards quite easily, just two or three days after opening. The photos below were contributed by Mariano Saviello. Photo 1-3 detail the flowers. In photo 2, it is possible to appreciate the glaucous leaves which gives the name to this species. Photos 4-5 compares two closely related species: H. iguazuanum (Argentina, left) and H. glaucescens (Brazil, right). Both species flower at the beginning of spring (September-October in the Southern Hemisphere).

Hippeastrum glaucescens, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum glaucescens, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum glaucescens, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum glaucescens, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum glaucescens, Mariano Saviello

Hippeastrum guarapuavicum is native to the province of Misiones, Argentina. It has white and purple-stripped flowers.


Hippeastrum iguazuanum see the Hippeastrum iguazuanum page.

Representative photos of this species. Photo 1 was taken by Germán Roitman and photos 2-6 were taken by Mariano Saviello

Hippeastrum iguazuanum, Germán RoitmanHippeastrum iguazuanum, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum iguazuanum, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum iguazuanum, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum iguazuanum, Mariano SavielloHippeastrum iguazuanum, Mariano Saviello

Hippeastrum intiflorum Pictures of this seldom seen Hippeastrum were taken by Doug Westfall in Long Beach California. It was grown from seed by Dennis Tsang in Hong Kong and sent to me a couple of yrs. ago. Very little has been written in the literature about Hippeastrum intiflorum. These are the observations made in my Southern California garden. The Inca people believed that "Inti" (Quechua for the sun) was the ancestor of the Inca people. So, the name, "intiflorum" means the "Flower of the Sun," or "Flower of a god". Certainly, the flower is one of the most beautiful of the Hippeastrum. The species is native to Quispecanchis Province in the Department of Cusco, Peru. It grows in deep river gorges above 2,500 meters. While the bulb probably has a significant amount of shade in the wild, it seems to benefit from a sunny location in cultivation. It should be planted in well draining soil in a two to five gallon container. My soil mix consists of 4 parts sand, 2 parts forest mulch, 2 parts peat, and 1 part perilite or pumice. The growth tip of the bulb is planted at or just below the surface of the planting mix. Hippeastrum intiflorum seems to thrive and bloom with regular feedings of quarter strength liquid fertilizer. (Thanks to Dennis Tsang, Albert Castillo, and the encyclopedia for information on location and meaning of the name.)

Hippeastrum intiflorum, Doug WestfallHippeastrum intiflorum, Doug WestfallHippeastrum intiflorum, Doug Westfall

Hippeastrum mandonii was collected by Fred Meyer in Bolivia in the 1970s. Flowers are lime green with red tips. Photos taken by Mary Sue Ittner at Telos Rare bulbs.

Hippeastrum mandonii, Mary Sue IttnerHippeastrum mandonii, Mary Sue Ittner

Hippeastrum miniatum is native to river gorges high in the Peruvian Andes. It seems to prefer part shade and is reported to produce up to six flowers on one stem on mature bulbs in ideal conditions. Photo taken by Doug Westfall.

Hippeastrum miniatum, Doug Westfall

Hippeastrum "neoleopoldii" (syn. Amaryllis neoleopoldii) is from Bolivia. The name has not been published since it was inadvertently left out when other Amaryllis species were transferred to Hippeastrum as it was not clear that it was a separate species from the very similar Hippeastrum leopoldii. Hippeastrum neoleopoldii has a more saturated red color and white flecks. We are adding it under "neoleopoldii" because it is grown under this name in cultivation. Photo from Doug Westfall.

Hippeastrum neoleopoldii, Doug Westfall

Hippeastrum species P-Z - Hippeastrum hybrids A-B - Hippeastrum hybrids C-H - Hippeastrum hybrids I-N - Hippeastrum hybrids O-Unnamed - Hippeastrum index - x Hippeastrelia


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Page last modified on March 27, 2014, at 06:29 PM