Spring Blooming Crocus Five

This page describes spring blooming Crocus species T-Z.


Crocus index - Fall Blooming crocus A-H - Fall Blooming crocus I-O - Fall Blooming crocus P-Z - Spring Blooming crocus A-B - Spring Blooming crocus C-E - Spring Blooming crocus F-L - Spring Blooming crocus M-S


Crocus tommasinianus has lilac to purple flowers and is native to Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Montenegro, Bulgaria and Hungary where it grows in woods and shady hillsides and blooms in winter. The plants below photographed by Kelly Irvin in the first three photos are naturalizing and growing well. The second is a close-up and the last a lighter colored clump. Photo 4 by Dell Sherk shows a sport that appeared in his garden and has extra petals, 8 or 9.

Crocus tommasinianus, Kelly IrvinCrocus tommasinianus closeup, Kelly IrvinCrocus tommasinianus paler clump, Kelly IrvinCrocus tommasinianus, extra petals, Dell Sherk

Photos of seed and seed pods by David Pilling. Photo 3 shows a millimeter scale. Photo 4 is unconnected with the others.

Crocus tommasinianus, 21st May 2015, seed, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus, 27th May 2015, seed, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus, 28th May 2015, seed, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus, seed, David Pilling

Crocus tommasinianus 'Ruby Giant' has larger and darker flowers and is extra vigorous. See a video of a solitary bee pollinating the flower here. Flower photo taken March 2005 by Jay Yourch. Corm photo by David Pilling shows Crocus tommasinianus 'Ruby Giant' left and Crocus chrysanthus right.

Crocus tommasinianus 'Ruby Giant', Jay YourchCrocus tommasinianus 'Ruby Giant' left, Crocus chrysanthus right, David Pilling

Crocus tommasinianus 'Barr's Purple'. Peter Barr founded the eponymous Covent Garden bulb and seed merchant in 1860 and was one of the first popularisers of Narcissus, becoming known as "the daffodil king". Photos by David Pilling include corms shown on a 10 mm grid. Photo 6 is of a seed pod at the end of May; note the bottom edge is at ground level and the total height of the pod is around 20 mm.

Crocus tommasinianus, Barr's Purple, corms, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus, Barr's Purple, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus, Barr's Purple, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus, Barr's Purple, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus, Barr's Purple, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus, Barr's Purple, seed pod, David Pilling

Time-lapse video by David Pilling, taken between 2:43 and 5:37 pm on the 14th February 2013, shows flowers in greenhouse closing as the sun sets.

Crocus tommasinianus 'Whitewell Purple'. Photos by David Pilling.

Crocus tommasinianus Whitewell Purple, corms, 18th October 2015, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus Whitewell Purple, 11th February 2016, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus Whitewell Purple, 18th February 2016, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus Whitewell Purple, 18th February 2016, David Pilling

Crocus tommasinianus 'Yalta' is a Janis Ruksans cultivar. He described its history here and believes it to be a hybrid between Crocus tommasinianus and a Crocus vernus hybrid such as 'Vanguard'. Photographs by David Pilling with corms in photo 1 shown on a 10 mm grid.

Crocus tommasinianus Yalta, corms, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus Yalta, 8th March 2014, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus Yalta, 8th March 2014, David PillingCrocus tommasinianus Yalta, 8th March 2014, David Pilling

Crocus veluchensis grows in the Balkans. The third and fourth photo show the albino form. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Crocus veluchensis, John LonsdaleCrocus veluchensis, John LonsdaleCrocus veluchensis albus, John LonsdaleCrocus veluchensis albus, John Lonsdale

Crocus veneris is from Cyprus and Crete. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Crocus veneris, John LonsdaleCrocus veneris, John Lonsdale

Crocus vernus is a species from which many cultivars have been selected by the Dutch.

Crocus vernus ssp. albiflorus is the spring flowering mountain plant of the Alps. It is smaller flowered and can be white, purple or striped. Three photos of plants growing in the wild near Wengen in the Swiss alps all photographed by Tony Goode show some of the variation in this species. In the last picture there is a back to front bicoloured form which is a possible match for Jane McGary's mystery crocus.

Crocus vernus ssp. albiflorus, Tony GoodeCrocus vernus ssp. albiflorus, Tony GoodeCrocus vernus ssp. albiflorus, Tony GoodeCrocus vernus ssp. albiflorus bicolored, Jane McGary

Crocus vernus ssp. vernus is a spring flowering Crocus with a wide distribution in the mountains of central and eastern Europe where it is found growing in woodland and sometimes subalpine meadows. It has purple flowers. Photos #1-3 by Arnold Trachtenberg. Photo #4 by Jane McGary shows a rogue form in exchanged seeds. It has narrow petals with unusual white margins. It flowers very early for C. vernus (first week of February) and produces seedlings of similar appearance.

Crocus vernus ssp.vernus, Arnold TrachtenbergCrocus vernus ssp.vernus 2, Arnold TrachtenbergCrocus vernus ssp.vernus 3, Arnold TrachtenbergCrocus vernus ssp.vernus seedling, Jane McGary

The first photo below, by Tony Goode, shows a form from the Balkans and populations further east with large rounded flowers with dark purple tips once known as Crocus heuffelianus. The second photo shows the plant from Ruksans named Crocus heuffelianus "Dark Eyes", photographed by Arnold Trachtenberg. The next two photos, by John Lonsdale, show another Balkan form, this one previously known as Crocus scepusiensis var leucostigma, now also considered to be C. vernus ssp. vernus.

Crocus vernus ssp.vernus, Balkan form, formerly Crocus heuffelianus, Tony GoodeCrocus vernus ssp. vernus 'Dark Eyes', Arnold TrachtenbergThe former Crocus scepusiensis var. leucostigma, John LonsdaleThe former Crocus scepusiensis var. leucostigma, John Lonsdale

Crocus vernus 'Flower Record' is a purple Dutch crocus. Photos by David Pilling, Crocus tommasinianus can be seen in some of them giving an idea of the relative sizes.

Crocus vernus 'Flower Record', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Flower Record', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Flower Record', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Flower Record', David Pilling

Crocus vernus 'Grand Maitre' (Grand Master in French) is a violet Dutch crocus. Photos by David Pilling.

Crocus vernus 'Grand Maitre', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Grand Maitre', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Grand Maitre', David Pilling

Crocus vernus 'Jeanne d'Arc' is a vigorous late blooming white Dutch crocus named after the 15th century French heroine Joan of Arc. See a video of a honeybee pollinating the flower here. Photos by David Pilling.

Crocus vernus 'Jeanne d'Arc', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Jeanne d'Arc', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Jeanne d'Arc', David Pilling

Crocus vernus 'Pickwick' is an extravagantly patterned cultivar. Honeybees and bumblebees like the flowers, see a video here. Photos by David Pilling. The coin in the last one is about one inch in diameter.

Crocus vernus 'Pickwick', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Pickwick', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Pickwick', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Pickwick', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Pickwick', David PillingCrocus vernus 'Pickwick', David Pilling

Crocus versicolor Ker-Gawler from southern France and northwestern Italy grows on stony and grassy places and in open woodland. Flowers are white, purple or lilac with a yellow throat and darker stripes on the outside. The outer segments are silver to buff. Bloom time is February-March. Photos 1-2 from Mary Sue Ittner taken January 2008 and photos 3-4 from Paige Woodward of a form descended from a collection in Provence that grows 5-8 cm (2-3.5"). She suggests this species is hardy to Zone 5.

Crocus versicolor, Mary Sue IttnerCrocus versicolor, Mary Sue IttnerCrocus versicolor, Paige WoodwardCrocus versicolor, Paige Woodward

Crocus vitellinus - the very first bulb to bloom in my garden this year is this winter-flowering species from Lebanon, Syria, and Turkey. The particular plants shown here were purchased as bulbs from Paige Woodward's Pacific Rim Nursery and planted out last fall. Just 2 days after 24" (60 cm) of hardened snow and ice receded on the warm south side my house, this tiny species popped into bloom. The first four photos were taken by Mark McDonough on March 22, 2003. The golden flowers have a pleasant sweet scent, and are brushed and speckled with brown on the exterior base of the tepals. Looking down on the flowers, they have a triangular countenance. The large glossy green leaves seen near the crocus bunch is Sternbergia lutea, which amazingly keeps its beautiful leaves even with an iceberg sitting on them all winter. The last two photos were taken by Paige Woodward.

Crocus vitellinus, Mark McDonoughCrocus vitellinus, Mark McDonoughCrocus vitellinus, Mark McDonoughCrocus vitellinus, Mark McDonoughCrocus vitellinus, Paige WoodwardCrocus vitellinus, Paige Woodward

Crocus index - Fall Blooming crocus A-H - Fall Blooming crocus I-O - Fall Blooming crocus P-Z - Spring Blooming crocus A-B - Spring Blooming crocus C-E - Spring Blooming crocus F-L - Spring Blooming crocus M-S


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Page last modified on February 20, 2016, at 04:52 PM