Albuca Three

Albuca is an African genus of more than 100 species belonging to the Hyacinthaceae family and includes some species more recently included in Ornithogalum. All Albuca species grow from bulbs, and most have a dormancy period after flowering whereby they lose their leaves. The flower scape is unbranched. The flowers are white and yellow and are embellished with a green to brown stripe down the middle of each outer tepal. Species G-P are found on this wiki page.


Albuca index - Albuca A-F - Albuca R-Z - Ornithogalum


Albuca hallii is native from the winter rainfall area in Namibia through the Hantamsberge to South of Calvinia. It is similar to Albuca spiralis. Plants are 10-15 cm tall, leaves are few, silvery glacous, corkscrewed only on the upper half of the leaves. In habitat flowers are formed March-May (autumn). Flowers are glaucous but not yellow-green found in other species. This species often produces a scape without leaves.


Albuca humilis is found on the edges and seams of rock sheets, gravel and silt patches and rock grassland up to 2800 meters in the Eastern Mountain Region of the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. It grows from 3 to 25 cm and has white flowers with the outer tepals striped green and the inner tepals tipped yellow. Photos taken at Naude's Nek January 2010 by Mary Sue Ittner.

Albuca humilis, Naude's Nek, Mary Sue IttnerAlbuca humilis, Naude's Nek, Mary Sue IttnerAlbuca humilis, Naude's Nek, Mary Sue IttnerAlbuca humilis, Naude's Nek, Mary Sue Ittner

Albuca juncifolia grows on sandy and calcareous flats in the western and southern Cape. Plants grow from 15 to 30 cm and have 4 to 10 slender stiff leaves that are not clasping below and usually terete above and nodding flowers that are yellow with green keels. It flowers in spring (September to October).


Albuca longipes grows in dry silty loam in karroid scrub from the Richtersveld to Biedouw Valley (mostly northwest Cape, winter rainfall areas of Namaqualand). It has white erect flowers with green keels. The hooded inner tepals have golden yellow tips. Flowers are 20 to 25 mm across and plants grow to about 20 cm. Photo 1 was taken by Alan Horstmann. Photo 2 was taken in the Cederberg by Mary Sue Ittner October 2006. Photos 3-4 were taken by Andrew Harvie near Springbok in Namaqualand.

Albuca longipes, Alan HorstmannAlbuca longipes, Mary Sue IttnerAlbuca longipes, Namaqualand, Andrew HarvieAlbuca longipes, Namaqualand, Andrew Harvie

The photos below were taken by Andrew Harvie in the De Hoop Nature Reserve. The species A. longipes is not known to be outside of Namaqualand, but these photos have been tentatively identified as this species.

Albuca longipes, De Hoop Nature Reserve, Andrew HarvieAlbuca longipes, De Hoop Nature Reserve, Andrew Harvie

Albuca massonii grows on sandstone slopes in the northwest Cape and flowers September to October. Plants are 20 to 30 cm high with two or three channeled slender leaves and nodding yellow to green flowers with green keels. Photos taken in habitat in the Oorlogskloof Nature Reserve by Andrew Harvie. The flowers were very small, about 10 mm long.

Albuca massonii, Oorlogskloof Nature Reserve, Andrew HarvieAlbuca massonii, Oorlogskloof Nature Reserve, Andrew Harvie

Albuca namaquensis see the Albuca namaquensis page.

Representative photos of this species. Photos from Mary Sue Ittner, Jacob Uluwehi Knecht, and Nhu Nguyen.

Albuca namaquensis, Middelpos, Mary Sue IttnerAlbuca namaquensis, Mary Sue IttnerAlbuca namaquensis bulb, Mary Sue IttnerAlbuca namaquensis, Jacob Uluwehi KnechtAlbuca namaquensis, Nhu NguyenAlbuca namaquensis, Nhu Nguyen

Albuca navicula U. Müller-Doblies, was described as new in 1994 and it occurs on red sandy flats from Clanwilliam to Namaqualand. It grows to 20 cm tall, its bulb typically depressed-globose. Leaves erect-ascending, straight and channeled like the hull of a boat (navicular), glaucous, finely hairy along the margins. Flowers in spring (about March) few per scape, dull green and nodding. This species is marked especially by its small size and "boat-like" leaves.

This is an excellent winter bulb for small pots. Dylan Hannon reports that it has grown well planted shallowly (not more than 1" deep) in 3" pots in a mix comprised mostly of sand and pumice with about 10% organic matter. A. navicula appreciates bright light and even full sun so long as hot temperatures are avoided. The soil mix should be allowed to dry between waterings. As with some other albucas and hyacinths, this species may remain dormant through a whole growing season-- in other words, it can skip a year of growth. This can happen in spite of abundant rain or watering and even with the development of a healthy new root system. This phenomenon appears to be a sort of stasis rather than a setback and a normal growth cycle can be expected the following season.

The photos below depict material collected by John Lavranos in southeastern Namaqualand, near Platbakkies in 1997 (Lavranos & Teissier 30685). Photographed and grown by Dylan Hannon.

Albuca navicula flower, Dylan HannonAlbuca navicula flower, Dylan HannonAlbuca navicula ciliate leaf margins, Dylan HannonAlbuca navicula leaves, Dylan HannonAlbuca navicula mature bulb, Dylan Hannon

Albuca nelsonii is one of the larger species, and is quite common in the nursery trade these days. The first two photos below by Roy Herold are of a nice planting at Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden in Cape Town, South Africa, in November, 2006. The next two photos were taken in habitat, Kei Mouth, Eastern Cape by Andrew Harvie.

Albuca nelsonii, Roy HeroldAlbuca nelsonii, Roy HeroldAlbuca nelsonii, Kei Mouth, Andrew HarvieAlbuca nelsonii, Kei Mouth, Andrew Harvie

Albuca osmynella (syn. Ornithogalum osmynellum) is endemic to the Oograbies Hills, Namaqualand, Northern Cape, South Africa. It is a Red List species. The first three photos from Monica Swartz show the mounding bulbs and the strange branching flowers. The leaves of this species are spiral but these photos don't show that. The last photo by Pamela Slate shows the bulbs.

Albuca osmynella, Monica SwartzAlbuca osmynella, Monica SwartzAlbuca osmynella, Monica SwartzAlbuca osmynella bulbs, Pamela Slate

Albuca pendula B. Matthew (1994) is native to southwestern Saudi Arabia. It is a cliff-dwelling species with pendulous leaves. It grows during winter and goes dormant in the summer. It is not tolerant of cold temperatures like South African natives. A light frost (-1 to -2 °C) will severely damage the foliage. It must therefore be protected during very frosty nights. The photos below were taken by Nhu Nguyen. Photo 1 shows a younger plant with a more erect habit. In later years as the bulb matures and the leaves get longer (up to a meter in length), the plant will take on a more pendulous habit.

Albuca pendula, Nhu NguyenAlbuca pendula, Nhu NguyenAlbuca pendula, Nhu Nguyen

Albuca polyphylla Baker (syn. Ornithogalum teretifolium Manning & Goldblatt) is native to the Eastern Cape and the eastern part of the Western Cape. According to Elsa Pooley in her book Mountain Flowers, this species is found in crevices of rock sheets and gravel and silt patches on rock sheets, in seasonally waterlogged areas in the Drakensberg Mountains. Flowers resemble Albuca humilis. See the full description of this species when it was published. The widely grown Albuca 'Augrabies Hills' probably belongs to this species.

The photos below were taken by Nhu Nguyen of a form from Willowmore, South Africa. Photos 4-6 show seedpods that resulted from crossing with Albuca 'Augrabies Hills'. Neither of these forms seem to be self fertile.

Albuca polyphylla, Willowmore, Nhu NguyenAlbuca polyphylla, Willowmore, Nhu NguyenAlbuca polyphylla, Willowmore, Nhu NguyenAlbuca polyphylla, Willowmore, Nhu NguyenAlbuca polyphylla, Willowmore, Nhu NguyenAlbuca polyphylla, Willowmore, Nhu Nguyen

The photos below were taken by Nhu Nguyen showing a comparison between Albuca 'Augrabies Hills' (left) to the Willowmore form (right). The only noticeable differences between these two forms are the sizes of the flowers. The Willowmore form is larger. Reciprocal crosses between these two forms have been successful.

Albuca 'Augrabies Hills' (left) & Willowmore form (right), Nhu NguyenAlbuca 'Augrabies Hills' (left) & Willowmore form (right), Nhu NguyenAlbuca 'Augrabies Hills' (left) & Willowmore form (right), Nhu NguyenAlbuca 'Augrabies Hills' (left) & Willowmore form (right), Nhu Nguyen

Albuca pulchra (syn. Ornithogalum pulchrum) is a tall summer growing species distributed from Namibia to Botswana. Photo by Rod Saunders.

Albuca pulchra, Rod Saunders

Albuca index - Albuca A-F - Albuca R-Z - Ornithogalum


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Page last modified on June 24, 2014, at 01:24 PM