Asian Fritillaria Four

Fritillaria that originate in Asia from S-Z are described on this page. For information about other species consult the links below.


Asian fritillaria A-C - Asian fritillaria D-K - Asian fritillaria L-R - European fritillaria A-O - European fritillaria P-Z - Fritillaria index - Miscellaneous fritillaria - North American fritillaria A-L - North American fritillaria M-Z


Fritillaria sewerzowii Regel., syn. Korolkowia sewerzowii, is native to screes in the mountains of Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Aghanistan, N Pakistan and W China. It grows to 20-30 cm (8-12") and has pale greenish yellow flowers with rust to bitter chocolate centers with flowers colored purple brown to yellow on the back. Leaves are thick, lanceolate, glaucous and up to 4 cm (2") wide. Photos from Paige Woodward who notes this is hardy to Zone 6, possibly colder. She grows this species in cold frames and a roofed rock garden. In the rock garden, the bulbs have gradually worked themselves to the surface, weathering freeze-thaw-freeze and growing fatter each year.

Fritillaria sewerzowii, Paige WoodwardFritillaria sewerzowii, Paige Woodward

Fritillaria sibthorpiana from southwestern Turkey is one of several species from that general region with conical yellow flowers. The photo does not show its distinctive pair of large basal leaves. Shown flowering in a bulb frame in Oregon in late March; should not be dried out too much in summer. Photo by Jane McGary.

Fritillaria sibthorpiana, Jane McGary

Fritillaria stenanthera is an early-blooming Rhinopetalum section member from West to Central Asia. Typical plants have light pink flowers. The image in photo 1 was taken by Jane McGary of a particularly deep pink form of this species and represents the increase of a single bulb grown from seed about ten years previously. It was grown in a bulb frame and kept dry in summer. Photos 2-6 were taken by John Lonsdale. Photos 5-6 are of a late pale form.

Fritillaria stenanthera, Jane McGaryFritillaria stenanthera, John LonsdaleFritillaria stenanthera, John LonsdaleFritillaria stenanthera, John LonsdaleFritillaria stenanthera, John LonsdaleFritillaria stenanthera, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria stenanthera 'Kazakhstan'

Fritillaria stenanthera 'Kazakhstan', John LonsdaleFritillaria stenanthera 'Kazakhstan', John Lonsdale

Fritillaria stenanthera 'Kyrgystan':

Fritillaria stenanthera 'Kyrgystan', John LonsdaleFritillaria stenanthera 'Kyrgystan', John Lonsdale

The first of these seed photos by David Pilling was taken using reflected light, the remainder with transmitted light. In photo 2 embryos are not visible; see Fritillaria Germination. Photo 3 taken 101 days later after the seeds had been exposed to cold (32-40 °F) and moisture shows germination is taking place.

Fritillaria stenanthera seed, reflected light, David PillingFritillaria stenanthera seed, transmitted light 9th January 2013, David PillingFritillaria stenanthera seed, transmitted light 20th April 2013, David Pilling

Fritillaria thunbergii is native to China and Japan where it is found in scrub and light woods. It has linear leaves that are whorled on the top where there are also tendril-like tips. Flowers are cream-colored, flecked or tessellated green. This species needs to be planted deeply. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria thunbergii, John LonsdaleFritillaria thunbergii, John LonsdaleFritillaria thunbergii, John LonsdaleFritillaria thunbergii, John LonsdaleFritillaria thunbergii, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria tortifolia is native to China. The plant in the photo received from China and shipped by Paul Christian as F. ferganensis has now been identified as Fritillaria tortifolia. These flowers are very large, white with faint purple tessellation, and resemble those of Fritillaria pallidiflora in form. The tall stem required support. Photo by Jane McGary.

Fritillaria tortifolia, Jane McGary

Fritillaria uva-vulpis syn. Fritillaria assyriaca is native to Turkey, Iraq, and Iran where it is often found in fields. The first photo from Jamie Vande is of the typical commercial form offered by most bulb houses. It likes sun and a well drained soil that is moist in the late winter and spring. The second photo is from Hans Joschko and the third photo from John Lonsdale. The last flower photo of the fox grape fritillaria was taken in the Montgomery County, Maryland, USA, USDA zone 7 garden of Jim McKenney who added his text. "This clump taught me a lesson: I forgot to dig it for the summer, and not only did the bulbs survive a wet summer, but the plants the next year were much bigger than those covered and kept dry for the summer. In the photo it is growing vigorously with Euroweeds Ranunculus ficaria and Veronica persica et al."

Fritillaria uva-vulpis, Jamie VandeFritillaria uva-vulpis, Hans JoschkoFritillaria uva-vulpis, John LonsdaleFritillaria uva-vulpis, Jim McKenney

In these seed photos by David Pilling, the first was taken using reflected light and the remainder with transmitted light. In photo 2 embryos are barely visible; see Fritillaria Germination. Photo 3 taken 67 days later after the seeds had been exposed to cold (32-40 °F) and moisture shows the embryos have developed and germination is taking place.

Fritillaria uva-vulpis seed, reflected light, David PillingFritillaria uva-vulpis seed, transmitted light 6th February 2013, David PillingFritillaria uva-vulpis seed, transmitted light 14th April 2013, David Pilling

Fritillaria verticillata Willdenow has been called by many names. The Kew checklist lists 18 taxa as synonyms. It is native from southern Siberia to Japan. Photo from Paige Woodward of a beautiful form that blooms abundantly in April, with up to six greenish-white bells on a 30-40 cm (12-16" ) stem. Its narrow leaves are tipped with tendrils to help it stand up in tall grass. Her plants descend from bulbs collected in the southern Altai Mountains where China and Kazakhstan meet. Being adapted to harsh conditions, it has done well in meager soil in sun to part shade and is drought-tolerant once established.

Fritillaria verticillata, Paige Woodward

In seed photos (on a 10 mm grid) by David Pilling, the second is of the same seed as the first using transmitted light and does not show large embryos. The third photo was taken after 41 days of exposure to cold (32-40 °F) and moisture. The fourth was taken after a further 30 days, when the seed is germinating. See Fritillaria Germination.

Fritillaria verticillata seed, reflected light, David PillingFritillaria verticillata seed, transmitted light 19th December 2012, David PillingFritillaria verticillata seed, transmitted light 29th January 2013, David PillingFritillaria verticillata seed, transmitted light 28th February 2013, David Pilling

Fritillaria walujewii can be found in the Tien Shan mountain range and in central Asia. It has three bells of pinkish-purple that are tessellated. Narrow leaves are opposite or whorled at the top with tendrils at the tip. Photo by John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria walujewii, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria zagrica is a short species native to Iran and Turkey. It has dark chocolate-purple flowers with yellow tips. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria zagrica, John LonsdaleFritillaria zagrica, John LonsdaleFritillaria zagrica, John Lonsdale

Asian fritillaria A-C - Asian fritillaria D-K - Asian fritillaria L-R - European fritillaria A-O - European fritillaria P-Z - Fritillaria index - Miscellaneous fritillaria - North American fritillaria A-L - North American fritillaria M-Z


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Page last modified on June 03, 2013, at 01:23 PM