Asian Fritillaria Two

Fritillaria that originate in Asia from D-K are described on this page. For information about other species consult the links below.


Asian fritillaria A-C - Asian fritillaria L-R - Asian fritillaria S-Z - European fritillaria A-O - European fritillaria P-Z - Fritillaria index - Miscellaneous fritillaria - North American fritillaria A-L - North American fritillaria M-Z


Fritillaria davidii is a Chinese species with a solitary yellow flower marked with purple. Photo by John Lonsdale of the leaves.

Fritillaria davidii, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria eduardii is closely related to Fritillaria imperialis and comes from Central Asia, east of the range of the latter. The illustrated plant in the first photo from Jane McGary was grown from seed collected by Josef Halda in the early 1990s and is kept in a bulb frame, dry in summer. This "miniature Crown Imperial" grows only about 40 cm tall (it elongates a bit after flowering in late winter) and is scentless, unlike the big Crown Imperial which has a foul odor. Photo 2-3 from Paige Woodward.

Fritillaria eduardii, Jane McGaryFritillaria eduardii, Paige WoodwardFritillaria eduardii, Paige Woodward

Photos below from John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria eduardii, John LonsdaleFritillaria eduardii, John LonsdaleFritillaria eduardii, John LonsdaleFritillaria eduardii, John LonsdaleFritillaria eduardii, John Lonsdale

Photo in its habitat in Tajikistan taken by Oron Peri.

Fritillaria eduardii, Oron PeriFritillaria eduardia in habitat, Oron Peri

Photo of seed by David Pilling, the first one was taken with reflected light, the remainder of the same seeds were taken using transmitted light, in the first of these embryos are barely visible, see Fritillaria Germination. The next photo taken 41 days later after the seeds had been exposed to cold (32-40 °F) and wet shows the embryos have developed. These seeds are thick and the results are not easy to see. The final photo shows one of the seeds germinating 87 days after they were sown. Most seeds did not germinate until 2014.

Fritillaria eduardii seed, reflected light, David PillingFritillaria eduardii seed, transmitted light 2nd February 2013, David PillingFritillaria eduardii seed, transmitted light 15th March 2013, David PillingFritillaria eduardii seed, transmitted light 30th April 2013, David Pilling

Fritillaria forbesii is a moderately tall (c. 12 in/30 cm) species from southwestern Turkey. The flowers are similar to those of Fritillaria carica and other species of the region (and to American Fritillaria pudica) but it is distinguished by its narrow, alternate stem leaves and lack of basal leaves. Grown from seed purchased from Archibalds, and flowering in a bulb frame in Oregon in March. Photo by Jane McGary

Fritillaria forbesii, Jane McGary

Fritillaria gibbosa is the most widespread species of the Rhinopetalum group. It is best grown in an Alpine house or a bulb frame, but still is difficult. It is native to Iran and Afghanistan where it grows in open stony or sandy places hot in summer. Flower color ranges from pink to red or apricot with a darker tessellated pattern. It has deep red nectaries. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria gibbosa, John LonsdaleFritillaria gibbosa,  John LonsdaleFritillaria gibbosa,  John Lonsdale

Fritillaria hermonis ssp. amana is a vigorous plant that increases freely by small bulbils. It has grey green leaves and reddish brown bell-like flowers with a central green stripe running the length of the petal. It is native to Turkey, Syria, and Lebanon. Photo by Arnold Trachtenberg.

Fritillaria hermonis ssp. amana, Arnold Trachtenberg

Fritillaria imperialis is a garden favourite that has proven difficult for many. It seems to like full sun and moist, well drained substrate, but I, also, have it growing in rather heavy soil near my pond. Drying a bit in the Summer seems to assist blooming (pers. observation) Photo 1 of the cultivar Fritillaria imperialis 'Aurora' and text by Jamie Vande. Photo 2 from Hans Joschko. Photo 3 of seed by David Pilling.

Fritillaria imperialis, Jamie VandeFritillaria imperialis, Hans JoschkoFritillaria imperialis seed, David Pilling

The tetraploid Fritillaria imperialis 'Lutea Maxima' looks very similar to diploid 'Lutea', unlike 'Rubra Maxima', which is much larger than 'Rubra'. Photo 1 by Jamie Vande. Photo 2 showing nectar droplets by David Pilling.

Fritillaria imperialis 'Lutea Maxima', Jamie VandeFritillaria imperialis 'Lutea Maxima' nectar 10th April 2014, David Pilling

Fritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', photos by David Pilling. The first shows a shoot breaking the surface in the middle of March. Photos 5 and 6 show droplets of nectar.

Fritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David Pilling

Some people say bulbs should be planted on their side, because of the large hole in them which may accumulate water. Others retort that the hole goes all the way through the bulb and so drains. Photos 1-4 are of commercially supplied bulbs of 'Garland Star' and show the hole, the bottom of the bulb and water being retained; the coin is around an inch in diameter. At first sight this disproves the idea of a hole all the way through the bulb. However often bulbs are sold with part of the old stem in place blocking the hole. Photo 5 from Laurence Hill shows the hole in a bulb of 'Lutea'. Since Fritillaria bulbs replace themselves every year, their original orientation in the ground will be lost anyway.

Fritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Garland Star', David PillingFritillaria imperialis 'Lutea', [[Laurence Hill]]

Fritillaria japonica was first described in Europe in 1867 from an illustration in a Japanese book of medicinal plants. The species is rare in cultivation and for many years Fritillaria koidzumiana was incorrectly considered a variety of Fritillaria japonica. Fritillaria koidzumiana has fimbriate edges mostly to the inner tepals and small papilla along the nectary margins whereas Fritillaria japonica does not. Fritillaria japonica is found in central and southwest Honshu and borders Fritillaria koidzumiana to the east of its range. Photographs by Laurence Hill taken in Japan; the first Honshu, Okayama Pref. near Mimasaka, 25 March 2010, below chestnut (which are not yet in leaf), 179 m; the second Honshu, Okayama Prefecture, Akaiwa-shi, 52 m, 5 April 2008, below deciduous trees in thin scrub with Anemone nikoensis, Erythronium japonicum and Cymbidium goeringii.

Fritillaria japonica, Japan, Honshu, Okayama Pref. near Mimasaka, 25 March 2010, Laurence HillFritillaria japonica, Japan, Honshu, Okayama Prefecture, Akaiwa-shi, 52 m, 5 April 2008, Laurence Hill

Fritillaria karelinii is from western China and central Afghanistan where it is found in semi-desert areas. It is similar to Fritillaria gibbosa. It has solitary flowers of rose pink with deeper spots and veining and a prominent nectary. Photos by Ian Young.

Fritillaria karelinii, Ian YoungFritillaria karelinii, Ian Young

Fritillaria karelinii 'Uzbekistan' photos by John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria karelinii, John LonsdaleFritillaria karelinii, John LonsdaleFritillaria karelinii, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria koidzumiana was considered to be Fritillaria japonica var. koidzumiana but is now accepted to be a species in its own right (see Fritillaria japonica for a description of the differences). It is rare and likes cool conditions. The perianth segments have a hair-like fringe around the margin. Photos 1-3 from John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria koidzumiana, John LonsdaleFritillaria koidzumiana, John LonsdaleFritillaria koidzumiana, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria kotschyana comes from the mountains of northern Iran, where it is said to inhabit both screes and rich soils. The photographed plants were grown from seed purchased from Archibalds. The very large flowers on short stems are upfacing when they open and then turn downward. The tepals tend to be spaced out to the base, unlike other frits. Easy to grow in a bulb frame, kept moderately dry but not arid in summer. Photo by Jane McGary

Fritillaria kotschyana, Jane McGary

Fritillaria kotschyana 'Craigton Max' is a selection by Ian Young. Photo also by Ian Young.

Fritillaria kotschyana 'Craigton Max', Ian Young"

Asian fritillaria A-C - Asian fritillaria L-R - Asian fritillaria S-Z - European fritillaria A-O - European fritillaria P-Z - Fritillaria index - Miscellaneous fritillaria - North American fritillaria A-L - North American fritillaria M-Z


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Page last modified on July 25, 2015, at 08:14 AM