European Fritillaria

Fritillaria species originating in Europe are described on this page. Species A-O are found on this page.


European fritillaria P-Z


Fritillaria burnatii syn. Fritillaria meleagris ssp. burnatii


Fritillaria conica is endemic to the Peloponnese where it grows in scrub. It has shiny green leaves and deep yellow conical flowers and is one of the easier yellow-flowered species to grow. Flower photos by John Lonsdale. Bulb photo by Peter Taggart.

Fritillaria conica, John LonsdaleFritillaria conica, John LonsdaleFritillaria conica, Peter Taggart

In seed photos by David Pilling where the second of the same seed was taken using transmitted light, embryos are barely visible; see Fritillaria Germination. The last photo taken 63 days later after the seeds had been exposed to cold (32-40 °F) and moisture shows the embryos have developed and germination is taking place.

Fritillaria conica, seed, reflected light, David PillingFritillaria conica, seed, transmitted light 9th February 2013, David PillingFritillaria conica, seed, transmitted light 14th April 2013, David Pilling

Fritillaria davisii is found on hillsides, scrub, olive groves and cornfields at low altitudes in the Peloponnese (Greece). This species has two broad leaves that rest on the ground and dark chocolate waxy flowers that are yellowish-green inside. This color shows lightly through to the outside petal tip. This species increases well. First two photos, by Mary Sue Ittner, are of plants blooming in February 2005 in Northern California. Third photo by John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria davisii, Mary Sue IttnerFritillaria davisii, Mary Sue IttnerFritillaria davisii, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria ehrhartii from the Aegean Islands of Greece, flowering in a bulb frame in Oregon in late March, showing the typical dusky purple flowers with a gray "bloom" on the outer surface and the small golden apices of the tepals. These four-year-old seedlings are in their second flowering year, an easy species to cultivate with a little overhead protection. Photo by Jane McGary.

Fritillaria ehrhartii, Jane McGary

Fritillaria elwesii is widespread in southwestern Turkey where it can be found in pine woodlands up to 900 m (3,000ft). It grows to 40 cm (16in) and has purple brown flowers with a clear green stripe. It prefers an open sunny situation that dries out in summer. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria elwesii, John LonsdaleFritillaria elwesii, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria euboeica is native to the Greek island of Evvoia and is closely related to Fritillaria carica and may be a subspecies of it. The flowers, on 5-inch/12- cm stems, are large in proportion. Grown from seed purchased from Archibalds. Photos by Jane McGary and John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria euboeica, Jane McGaryFritillaria euboeica, John LonsdaleFritillaria euboeica, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria graeca is native to Albania, Yugoslavia, Greece and Crete; it has brown bells with a green stripe.

Seed photos by David Pilling, the second was taken using transmitted light, embryos are barely visible, see Fritillaria Germination. The next photo taken 67 days later after the seeds had been exposed to cold (32-40 °F) and moisture shows the embryos have developed and germination is taking place.

Fritillaria graeca seed, reflected light, David PillingFritillaria graeca seed, transmitted light 6th February 2013, David PillingFritillaria graeca seed, transmitted light 14th April 2013, David Pilling

Fritillaria gussichiae is native to Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, and Greece where it is found in woodlands and has pale green untessellated flowers flushed brown.


Fritillaria meleagris see the Fritillaria meleagris page. Representative photos of this species by Arnold Trachtenberg, David Pilling, and Mary Sue Ittner.

Fritillaria meleagris, Arnold TrachtenbergFritillaria meleagris unicolor alba, David PillingFritillaria meleagris, David PillingFritillaria meleagris, Mary Sue Ittner

Fritillaria messanensis is a Mediterranean species with flowers that are hanging bells of chequered brown and green with a green stripe down the center of each petal. Blooming for the first time in March 2006 from seed sown in the fall of 1999. Photo by Mary Sue Ittner.

Fritillaria messanensis, Mary Sue Ittner

Fritillaria messanensis ssp. gracilis from the northwestern Balkan region is a plant of alpine meadows and light woodland, well adapted to gardens in temperate regions. Shown flowering in Oregon in late March. Photo by Jane McGary.

Fritillaria messanensis ssp. gracilis, Jane McGary

Fritillaria obliqua is native to the vicinity of Athens, Greece, where it is endangered owing to loss of habitat to development. The name obliqua refers to the slightly tilted attitude of the flowers, as shown in the photo. The deep purple tepals are satiny in texture, contrasting with the bright golden pollen within. Shown flowering in a bulb frame in Oregon in March. Photo by Jane McGary.

Fritillaria obliqua, Jane McGary

Asian fritillaria A-C - Asian fritillaria D-K - Asian fritillaria L-R - Asian fritillaria S-Z - European fritillaria P-Z - Fritillaria index - Miscellaneous fritillaria - North American fritillaria A-L - North American fritillaria M-Z


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Page last modified on April 13, 2015, at 10:48 AM