Tulipa Species Two

Tulipa species D-H are found on this wiki page


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Tulipa dasystemon growing in the wild on the eastern Tien Shan mountains, Kazakstan, in June 2004. The following photographs were taken on the Talgar Pass at about 9,000 feet. The second picture shows Tulipa dasystemon (on the left) growing with Tulipa heterophylla (on right). Photos by David Victor.

Tulipa dasystemon, David VictorTulipa dasystemon, David Victor

Tulipa dasystemonoides growing in the wild in the western Tien Shan mountains, Kazakstan,in July 2004. The photograph was taken at the Ulkun-Kyindi Pass at roughly 9,000 feet. Closely related to Tulipa dasystemon,the differences being mainly in the tunication. Photos by David Victor.

Tulipa dasystemonoides, David VictorTulipa dasystemonoides, David Victor

Tulipa edulis, syn. Amana edulis is a native of Japan, Korea, and Eastern China where it grows on open hillsides. It blooms in early spring bearing several white yellow-eyed flowers with a strongly veined reddish-brown exterior. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Tulipa edulis, John LonsdaleTulipa edulis, John Lonsdale

Tulipa eichleri syn. Tulipa undulatifolia is from Turkey, Iran, and Greece. It is widely bell-shaped with bright scarlet flowers with yellow margins and a dark basal blotch. The first photo by Arnold Trachtenberg. The other photos from Janos Agoston.

Tulipa eichleri, Arnold TrachtenbergTulipa eichleri, Janos AgostonTulipa eichleri, Janos AgostonTulipa eichleri, Janos AgostonTulipa eichleri, Janos Agoston

Tulipa ferganica from Soviet Cental Asia where it grows on bare rocky hillsides has bright yellow flowers. Grown in New Jersey, photo by Arnold Trachtenberg.

Tulipa ferganica, Arnold Trachtenberg

Tulipa fosteriana is a robust species from Central Asia that has large red flowers, often lined with black, that grows on rocky scrub-covered hillsides.

Tulipa fosteriana 'Juan' has red-orange flowers with yellow centers and beautiful variegated leaves. I've been able to grow it for many years in a container in Northern California by refrigerating it for 4-6 weeks every year before I plant it. In March 2004 it is blooming in a heat wave and a bit droopy. Photo by Mary Sue Ittner.

Tulipa fosteriana 'Juan', Mary Sue Ittner

Tulipa greigii growing in the wild on the western Tien Shan mountains, Kazakstan, in June 2004. The photographs were taken in the Ulkun-Kyindi valley at roughly 9,000 feet. The plants were growing on a hot dry bank, above the other species tulips which were growing in the bottom of the valley. Photos by David Victor. Greig's tulip was named in 1877 for Sir Samuel Greig (1735-1788, "Father of the Russian navy") by Eduard August von Regel (1815-1892), director of the St Petersburg Botanical Garden.

Tulipa greigii, David VictorTulipa greigii, David VictorTulipa greigii, David Victor

Tulipa heterophylla growing in the wild on the eastern Tien Shan mountains, Kazakstan, in June 2004. The first two shots were taken near a redundant Russian space centre at some 11,000 feet, whilst the other two were taken in the Talgar Pass at roughly 9,000 feet. The second shot includes a lens hood for size comparison: They are small plants! The third shot clearly shows the density of plants on the mountain side. Photos by David Victor.

Tulipa heterophylla, David VictorTulipa heterophylla, David VictorTulipa heterophylla, David VictorTulipa heterophylla, David Victor

Tulipa hissarica is from the Hissar Range in Tajikistan and Uzbekista. It apears soon after snow melts at high elevations, differs from T. dasystemon by having 4 undulate leaves, usually with red margins. First photo by John Lonsdale; photos 2 and 3 taken in its habitat in Tajikistan by Oron Peri.

Tulipa hissarica, John LonsdaleTulipa hissarica, Oron PeriTulipa hissarica, Oron Peri

Tulipa humilis is a species from southeastern Turkey, Iran, and the Caucasus that is variable in color and form. The humilis complex grows on mountain slopes often near the snowline. Members of this complex are T. violacea, T. pulchella, T. kurdica and T. lownei. T. humilis in gardens is the name given to a dwarf tulip with nice pink flowers and a yellow center. The flowers have a sweet yet peculiar clay-like earthen scent. The first photo by Mark McDonough shows flowers grown from Dutch bulb stock available at garden nursery centers in the fall. In the photograph, one plant has much darker red-rose flowers. The second photo was taken by Arnold Trachtenberg.

Tulipa humilis, Mark McDonoughTulipa humilis, Arnold Trachtenberg

Tulipa humilis 'Alba Coerulea Oculata' is a cultivar (with a name often seen with different spellings including 'Albocaerulea-oculata', 'Albocoerulea Oculata', 'Albo-caerulea Occulata') that is white with a steel blue base. Photo by Arnold Trachtenberg.

Tulipa humilis 'Alba Coerulea Oculata', Arnold Trachtenberg

Tulipa humilis 'Eastern Star' Photo 1 of bulbs by David Pilling. Remainder of resulting plants in Spring.

Tulipa humilis 'Eastern Star', 4th November 2014, David PillingTulipa humilis 'Eastern Star', 6th March 2015, David Pilling

Tulipa humilis 'Lilliput' is red with a violet base and more than one flower per stem. Photo by John Lonsdale.

Tulipa humilis 'Lilliput', John Lonsdale

Tulipa humilis 'Red Cup' This plant was purchased under this name, but there is also a Tulipa hageri 'Red Cup'. I haven't been able to find much information about this cultivar and wonder if it is correctly named. Photos by Mary Sue Ittner. The bulbs are on a 1 cm grid.

Tulipa humilis 'Red Cup', Mary Sue IttnerTulipa humilis 'Red Cup', Mary Sue IttnerTulipa humilis 'Red Cup', Mary Sue IttnerTulipa humilis 'Red Cup' bulbs, Mary Sue Ittner

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Page last modified on May 13, 2015, at 06:25 PM