Watsonia Two

Watsonia is a genus in the Iridaceae family of over 50 species from both the winter and summer rainfall areas of Southern Africa. Many are quite tall with fans of sword-shaped leaves and showy flowers. Watsonia species A-F are found on this page.


Watsonia species G-M - Watsonia species N-Z - Watsonia index


Watsonia aletroides (Burman fil.) Ker Gawler is a Cape species found on clay slopes in renosterveld and flowering in spring. It grows to 45 cm high with sword-shaped leaves and red, occasionally pink or mauve nodding flowers in an unbranched spike. The first two photos are by Mary Sue Ittner of garden plants in Northern California where they are planted in the ground in the second picture next to Watsonia marginata leaves. The third and fourth pictures are by Rogan Roth of plants flowering abundantly in a seasonally wet and burnt area near the town of Swellendam, Western Cape. The fifth picture is of a very small pink form (under two feet / 0.7 m) grown in California by Michael Mace. There is a small bee hiding in the flower. This form blooms in late spring (mid-May) in California.

Watsonia aletroides, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia aletroides, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia aletroides, Rogan RothWatsonia aletroides, Rogan RothWatsonia aletroides, Michael Mace

The photos below from Cameron McMaster show different color forms.

Watsonia aletroides, Cameron McMasterWatsonia aletroides, Cameron McMasterWatsonia aletroides, Cameron McMaster

Watsonia amatolae Goldblatt occurs in the Eastern Cape in the Amatola Mountains. The purple pink flowers appear in summer. Photos by Cameron McMaster.

Watsonia amatolae, Cameron McMasterWatsonia amatolae, Cameron McMaster

Watsonia angusta Ker Gawler is evergreen, growing to 1.2 metes and is found in montane marshes and streambanks in fynbos in many areas in the Cape Province to southern KwaZulu-Natal. It has scarlet flowers in a usually branched spike and multiplies rapidly. It is suitable for a wet part of a garden. Photo by Cameron McMaster.

Watsonia angusta, Cameron McMaster

Watsonia borbonica (Pourret) Goldblatt is a species from the Northwest and Southwest Cape where it is found on rocky sandstone slopes, on granite and clay at various elevations and blooming at different times from spring to summer. It grows from 50 to 200 cm and blooms best in the wild after a fire. It has large sword-shaped leaves and mostly purple-pink, occasionally white flowers. Detailed information about this species can be found on the South African National Biodiversity Institute's website. The first photo was taken in Alan Horstmann's yard in 2006. Photos two and three were taken at Lion's Head in the Table Mountain National Park showing flowers being pollinated by beetles. Those three photos were taken by Mary Sue Ittner. The last photo was taken at Drayton by Cameron McMaster.

Watsonia borbonica, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia borbonica, Lion's Head, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia borbonica, Lion's Head, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia borbonica, Drayton, Cameron McMaster

Watsonia borbonica subsp. ardernei (Sander) Goldblatt has stamens that are bent downwards and anthers that lie flat but rise towards the tip. The first photo was taken by Alan Horstmann. The next two photos were taken in the Overberg by Cameron McMaster after a fire. There is a tall form in cultivation that has white flowers known as 'Ardern's White' that has been growing in Southern California gardens for over 50 years.

Watsonia borbonica ssp. ardernei, Alan HorstmannWatsonia borbonica ssp. ardernei, Cameron McMasterWatsonia borbonica ssp. ardernei, Cameron McMaster

Watsonia borbonica subsp. borbonica has stamens that are bow-shaped to horizontal, and horizontal anthers. Photo by Alan Horstmann.

Watsonia borbonica, Alan Horstmann

Watsonia coccinea (Herbert. ex Baker) Baker is found on sandstone flats and plateaus in the Southwest Cape and Agulhas Plain. In spite of the name flowers can be scarlet, purple, or pink. It is a short species (under two feet; 2/3 of a meter) and a very pretty one, and is easier to grow in pots than most Watsonias. I haven't found it to be a reliable bloomer in that it skips some years. Unlike some it does not appear to increase very much either. First two photos by Mary Sue Ittner of flowers and of corms on a grid of 1 cm. squares. Third and fourth photos are by Michael Mace of a form received as seed from Kirstenbosch Garden, back in the happy days when it still sent seed to foreign members.

Watsonia coccinea, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia coccinea, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia coccinea, Michael MaceWatsonia coccinea, Michael Mace

Watsonia confusa Goldblatt grows in damp sites or grassland from the coast to 1000 meters from the Eastern Cape Province to KwaZulu-Natal. It is large, up to 1.5 meters, and has more or less 30 pink to purple flowers on an unbranched stem. The first photo taken by Cameron McMaster January 2008 at Elands Heights, Maclear. The second photo was taken by Rod Saunders. The last three were taken January 2010 at Maclear by Mary Sue Ittner.

Watsonia confusa, Elands Heights, Cameron McMasterWatsonia confusa, Rod SaundersWatsonia confusa, Maclear, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia confusa, Maclear, Mary Sue IttnerWatsonia confusa, Maclear, Mary Sue Ittner

Watsonia densiflora Baker is a common summer-growing species found in the midlands and uplands of KwaZulu-Natal. Two color forms of this species are illustrated here. Photos 1 to 2 by Rogan Roth. The last photo was taken by Rod Saunders from Silverhill Seeds.

Watsonia densiflora pink, Rogan RothWatsonia densiflora white, Rogan RothWatsonia densiflora, Rod Saunders

Watsonia fourcadei J.W.Mathews & L.Bolus grows on rocky sandstone slopes from the Western Cape to the Eastern Cape to Swaziland.It flowers November to January. This species grows to 2 meters and has sword shaped leaves and mostly orange to red, rarely pink or purple, flowers in elongate spikes. Photos by Cameron McMaster taken at Caledon and Napier Mountain in the Overberg.

Watsonia fourcadei, Caledon, Cameron McMasterWatsonia fourcadei, Caledon, Cameron McMasterWatsonia fourcadei, Napier Mountain, Cameron McMasterWatsonia fourcadei, Napier Mountain, Cameron McMaster

The photos below show the pink form, grown in California by Michael Mace from seeds supplied by Kirstenbosch. In California it blooms in early June.

Watsonia fourcadei, Michael MaceWatsonia fourcadei, Michael Mace

Watsonia species G-M - Watsonia species N-Z - Watsonia index


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Page last modified on August 30, 2014, at 05:35 PM