Asian Fritillaria Three

Fritillaria that originate in Asia from L-R are described on this page. For information about other species consult the links below.


Asian fritillaria A-C - Asian fritillaria D-K - Asian fritillaria S-Z - European fritillaria A-O - European fritillaria P-Z - Fritillaria index - Miscellaneous fritillaria - North American fritillaria A-L - North American fritillaria M-Z


Fritillaria latifolia is distributed in northeast Turkey, Caucasus, and northwest Iran. Photo 1 by Jane McGary shows it flowering in February in a bulb frame in Oregon. The pictured plant was grown from seed purchased from Archibalds under number 498.205 "ex R. & R. Wallis 93A-48," said to originate in Gumushane, Turkey. All English descriptions, including that in the Archibald seedlist, refer to "glossy green" leaves, and this specimen has glaucous leaves, as well as a slightly deformed flower with some abortive extra tepals inside. However, the 2004 catalog of Janis Ruksans illustrates a glaucous-leaved F. latifolia wild collected in the Caucasus, so perhaps this characteristic is variable. Photos 2 and 3 by Oron Peri are of the species in habitat in Georgia, including a rare green form.

Fritillaria latifolia, Jane McGaryFritillaria latifolia in habitat, Oron PeriFritillaria latifolia, green form, Oron Peri

Fritillaria michailovskyi is a native of Turkey that grows in alpine turf near the snow line. It has brownish-purple flowers with the lower third bright yellow. Photos by Arnold Trachtenberg and John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria michailovskyi, Arnold TrachtenbergFritillaria michailovskyi, John LonsdaleFritillaria michailovskyi, John Lonsdale

Seed photos by David Pilling, the second was taken using transmitted light, and the third 31 days later after the seeds had been exposed to moisture and cold (32-40 °F), it can be seen the embryos have developed, see Fritillaria Germination. The final photo was taken after a further 49 days and shows seeds germinating.

Fritillaria michailovskyi seed, David PillingFritillaria michailovskyi seed 10th January 2013, David PillingFritillaria michailovskyi seed 10th February 2013, David PillingFritillaria michailovskyi seed 9th April 2013, David Pilling

Fritillaria minuta is from east Turkey where is grows on stony slopes. It has reddish-brown or orange solitary pendant flowers and bright shiny green leaves. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria minuta, John LonsdaleFritillaria minuta, John LonsdaleFritillaria minuta, John LonsdaleFritillaria minuta, John Lonsdale

Fritillaria pallidiflora is a native of central Asia with grey leaves and bells of pale yellow. Photos by Arnold Trachtenberg and John Lonsdale.

Fritillaria pallidiflora, Arnold TrachtenbergFritillaria pallidiflora, John LonsdaleFritillaria pallidiflora, John LonsdaleFritillaria pallidiflora, John LonsdaleFritillaria pallidiflora, John Lonsdale

Grown from Holland bulbs offered in the autumn, this is a delicate beauty, with nicely proportioned pastel yellow blooms, elegant in countenance, and externally speckled in green. It survived a couple of years, then was lost due to rodent predation. Generally available in the autumn where Holland bulbs are sold, inexpensive, and well worth growing in an open shaded spot. First photo by Mark McDonough; remaining photos by David Pilling starting with bulbs as received from Holland; next photo plants in a 7 cm pot.

Fritillaria pallidiflora, Mark McDonoughFritillaria pallidiflora, David PillingFritillaria pallidiflora, David Pilling

Fritillaria persica has a large range from S. Turkey to western Iran, south to Jordan and Israel, and is quite variable. Pictured are seedlings of the clone 'Adiyaman', which duplicate that clone's unusually large, deep purple flowers. (Bulbs now sold as 'Adiyaman' often are an inferior seedling strain with small brownish flowers, which is, however, a more tolerant garden plant.) These very tall frits require excellent drainage; in Oregon, where these were photographed, these large-flowered ones do better in a bulb frame, while the commercial strain does well outdoors. A white form is shown in the following entry. Photo by Jane McGary

Fritillaria  persica, Jane McGary

Photos of unrelated commercial bulbs by David Pilling (the coin is about an inch in diameter); both shoots are from one bulb. Two things about Fritillaria bulbs which can be difficult to believe are that they have a hole through them, and a new bulb forms each year to replace the old one. Photo 3 shows development in Autumn, with a new bulb forming around the shoot; the green stick has been inserted through the hole in the original bulb. Photos 4 and 5 show flowers in Spring.

Fritillaria  persica bulb, David PillingFritillaria  persica bulb, David PillingFritillaria  persica bulb, David PillingFritillaria  persica 24th March 2015, David PillingFritillaria  persica 24th March 2015, David Pilling

Fritillaria persica 'Ivory Tower' photo taken at Floriade 2002 by Bill Dijk.

Fritillaria persica ‘Ivory Tower’, Bill Dijk

Fritillaria pinardii is native to the eastern Mediterranean, especially to Turkey. It is quite variable; the photos shows a typical population grown from wild-collected seeds from Armenia, a golden yellow form from another Turkish wild collection, and forms with rich copper-colored interiors (also Archibalds). It is easily grown from seed. These plants are in a bulb frame in Oregon, flowering in March; they are kept somewhat dry but not arid in summer. Photos by Jane McGary.

Fritillaria pinardii, Jane McGaryFritillaria pinardii, Jane McGaryFritillaria pinardii, Jane McGary

Photos below by Ian Young

Fritillaria pinardii, Ian YoungFritillaria pinardii, Ian Young

Asian fritillaria A-C - Asian fritillaria D-K - Asian fritillaria S-Z - European fritillaria A-O - European fritillaria P-Z - Fritillaria index - Miscellaneous fritillaria - North American fritillaria A-L - North American fritillaria M-Z


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Page last modified on July 26, 2015, at 06:37 AM