Spring Blooming Crocus Four

This PBS wiki page describes Spring Blooming crocus species M-S.


Crocus index - Fall Blooming crocus A-H - Fall Blooming crocus I-O - Fall Blooming crocus P-Z - Spring Blooming crocus A-B - Spring Blooming crocus C-E - Spring Blooming Crocus F-L - Spring Blooming crocus T-Z


Crocus malyi grows in grassy rocky places in the western Balkans. It has long white flowers with a yellow throat and a bright orange style. It appeared in my garden in Northern California before the leaves the end of January 2006 when we were getting a lot of rain and lasted only briefly. The leaves appeared in February. Photos by Mary Sue Ittner.

Crocus malyi from above, Mary Sue IttnerCrocus malyi silhouette, Mary Sue Ittner

Crocus michelsonii is native to the Kopet Dag range of Turkmenistan and Iran, growing on stony hills and sagebrush steppe at mid elevations. The plants pictured were grown by Jane McGary from seed collected in 2000 by Jan Jilek. They are kept in a bulb frame, fairly dry in summer, and here are flowering in late January after a prolonged period below freezing, when they were covered. The flowers are large and a beautiful shade of blue, and the plants seem robust. Photo by Jane McGary.

Crocus michelsonii, Jane McGary

Crocus minimus comes from the west coast of Corsica at altitudes up to 2,000 feet (700 meters), but grows at higher altitudes in Sardinia. It blooms from January to April in its native habitat. Mathew says it is easy to grow in a rock garden. First two photos by John Lonsdale, remainder by Roland and Gemma.

Crocus minimus, John LonsdaleCrocus minimus albus, John LonsdaleCrocus minimus, Roland and GemmaCrocus minimus, Roland and GemmaCrocus minimus, Roland and GemmaCrocus minimus, Roland and Gemma

A PBS member writes "The corm tunics have parallel fibers, a characteristic that distinguishes C. minimus from the similar C. corsicus, which has more reticulate (netted) fibers. The photographed flowers (below) are typical of the commercially propagated variety of C. minimus, which is more strongly marked on the outer (reverse) than some wild forms. It also has larger flowers and wider tepals than some I have grown from wild-collected seed or seed from such stock." These were grown and photographed in late January by M.Gastil-Buhl who acquired the corms from Telos Rare Bulbs, shown on a 1 cm grid. They close tightly each night and open when the sun is out. The bud emerges from a transparent sheath, barely visible around the base of the bud on the left in the fourth photo. Some corms have two flowers.

Crocus minimus corms, M. Gastil-BuhlCrocus minimus, M. Gastil-BuhlCrocus minimus, M. Gastil-BuhlCrocus minimus, M. Gastil-Buhl

Crocus minimus 'Bavella' is a collection from Alan Edwards that comes true from seed; it has a characteristic white style. Photographs by Rimmer de Vries, I grew this from SRGC seed, resulting in the tiny deep dark purple late blooming crocus (latest blooming spring crocus) unlike anything sold by the Dutch importers.

Crocus minimus 'Bavella', Rimmer de VriesCrocus minimus 'Bavella', Rimmer de VriesCrocus minimus 'Bavella', Rimmer de VriesCrocus minimus 'Bavella', Rimmer de VriesCrocus minimus 'Bavella', Rimmer de Vries

Crocus nevadensis (synonyms C. atlanticus and C. algeriensis) should be grown in an alpine house or frame in the UK, according to Mathew, as it is not very vigorous. It is native to the Sierra Nevada and Sierra de San Cristoval of Spain, and also grows in Morocco, and in Algeria in Oran. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Crocus nevadensis, John LonsdaleCrocus nevadensis, John Lonsdale

Crocus olivieri was named after botanist Guillaume Olivier, who collected it on an Aegean island. This species also grows in the Balkans, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, and Turkey. Subspecies olivieri has unmarked flowers, but subspecies balansae has dark markings on the backs of the perianths. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Crocus olivieri ssp. olivieri, John LonsdaleCrocus olivieri ssp. olivieri, John LonsdaleCrocus olivieri ssp. balansae, John LonsdaleCrocus olivieri ssp. balansae, John Lonsdale

Crocus paschei comes from the Taurus Mountains of Turkey. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Crocus paschei, John LonsdaleCrocus paschei, John Lonsdale

Crocus pestalozzae comes from northwestern Turkey. It was named in honor of Italian doctor Fortunato Pestalozza, who botanized in Italy and Syria in the 1800s. In the first photo you can see the dark spots at the base of the filaments which are a distinctive feature of this species. The fourth photo is of forma caeruleus, which is pale blue and is found near Istanbul. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Crocus pestalozzae, John LonsdaleCrocus pestalozzae, John LonsdaleCrocus pestalozzae, John LonsdaleCrocus pestalozzae, John Lonsdale

Crocus reticulatus has strong stripes on the outside of the flower. It has a broad range, from Eastern Europe to the Caucasus and Turkey. Bowles wrote, "it is unfortunately rather a weakling in cultivation and seldom holds its own in the open ground." The photos show subspecies hitticus, which has very distinctive dark anthers. It comes from southern Turkey. Photos by John Lonsdale.

Crocus reticulatus ssp. hittiticus, John LonsdaleCrocus reticulatus ssp. hittiticus, John Lonsdale

Crocus rujanensis is shown flowering in a bulb frame in Oregon in late January. These plants were grown from seed supplied by Jim & Jenny Archibald. Photo by Jane McGary. This species has purple flowers with a yellow throat and is from Serbia and Macedonia.

Crocus rujanensis, Jane McGary

Crocus sieberi is a spring flowering crocus. There are four subspecies. Subspecies atticus and sieberi are plants of lower altitudes. Subspecies nivalis and sublimis are plants of high mountains, often flowering near melting snow. The species was described by French botanist Jacques Gay in 1831 from specimens collected by the Czech Franz Sieber in Crete. The corms are edible and taste of hazelnuts.

Crocus sieberi ssp. atticus is from Greece where it grows on stony slopes and open coniferous woods. It has lilac-blue flowers and a yellow throat and is an easy plant to grow, tolerating summer water. Photograph by Tony Goode.

Crocus sieberi ssp. atticus, Tony Goode

Crocus sieberi ssp. nivalis is from Greece where in is found in short mountain turf. It is distinguished from subspecies atticus and sublimis by the absence of hairs in the throat of the flower and by its fine fibrous netted tunic. It is a plant of high mountains, often flowering near melting snow.

Crocus sieberi ssp. sieberi is from Crete where it grows on stony hillsides and short grazed turf. It is distinguished from other species by having white flowers with purple stain on the exterior of the outer petals and a yellow throat. This subspecies requires a dry summer rest. Photo from John Lonsdale could be this taxa or a cultivar.

Crocus sieberi, John Lonsdale

Crocus sieberi ssp. sublimus is from Greece, Macedonia, Albania and Bulgaria. It grows in short mountain turf or open woodland and has lilac blue flowers, sometimes with darker tips and a white zone between the petals and the yellow throat. It is a high altitude species, often flowering near melting snow.

Crocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor' - Photos #1-3 were taken by Mark McDonough of plants flowering in his garden, spring 2002, Pepperell, Massachusetts, USA. The overhead view, as well as the profile views reveal the beautiful coloration of this fine crocus. This cultivar adapts well to cultivation in UK gardens forming clumps. Photo #4 was taken by Arnold Trachtenberg, #5 by Tony Goode.

Crocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor', Mark McDonoughCrocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor', Mark McDonoughCrocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor', Mark McDonoughCrocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor', Arnold TrachtenbergCrocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor', Tony Goode

Photo of corms on a 10 mm grid and resulting flowers by David Pilling.

Crocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor' corms 3rd October 2013, David PillingCrocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor' 24th February 2013, David PillingCrocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor' 27th February 2013, David PillingCrocus sieberi ssp. sublimus 'Tricolor' 27th February 2013, David Pilling

Time lapse by David Pilling of Crocus sieberi taken between 14:37 and 17:11 on the 28th February 2014, showing flowers closing as the sun sets and temperatures drop.

Crocus sieberi 'Bowles White', photographed by Tony Goode.

Crocus sieberi 'Bowles White', Tony Goode

Crocus sieberi 'Hubert Edelsten' is a cross between ssp. atticus and ssp. sieberi, photographed by Tony Goode.

Crocus sieberi 'Hubert Edelsten', Tony Goode

Crocus sieheanus is from south-central Turkey in the Taurus Mountains at 1,200-2,000 meters (3,500-6,000 feet). Tony Goode recommends that it be given plenty of moisture in spring but a long dry rest in summer. Photo by John Lonsdale.

Crocus sieheanus, John Lonsdale

Crocus index - Fall Blooming crocus A-H - Fall Blooming crocus I-O - Fall Blooming crocus P-Z - Spring Blooming crocus A-B - Spring Blooming crocus C-E - Spring Blooming Crocus F-L - Spring Blooming crocus T-Z


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Page last modified on March 02, 2014, at 06:45 PM