Zephyranthes

Zephyranthes are commonly called rain lilies since they often come into bloom after it rains. From the Amaryllidaceae family, they are native to the southeastern United States, Central America, and South America. Most are spring or summer flowering. Zephyranthes flowers are very similar to Habranthus flowers and both are called rain lilies. Habranthus flowers point upward BUT at an angle and have unequal stamens, and Zephyranthes flowers point straight up and have equal stamens. Zephyranthes flowers tend to be star shaped and Habranthus have somewhat irregular flowers. Additionally, the seeds of Habranthus are slightly winged (and thicker).

Cultivation from seed is easy in this group. Seeds are papery and can be floated but they sprout very easily sown under just a thin covering of sowing medium. Sow the seeds in a well-drained mix and keep in a warm place. The seedlings will grow well in warm weather and respond well to fertilizer. As with any papery seeded amaryllids, these have a relatively short viability period.

Zephyranthes Hybrids is our wiki page with pictures of hybrids.


Zephyranthes atamasco is a spring flowering species of the southern United States (Virginia to Florida and west to Alabama) usually found in swamps and damp clearings. Broad grassy foliage appears in winter and plants go dormant in summer. The white flowers are very large. The first two photos, taken by Bob Rutemoeller, are of a March flowering in Northern California. The second photo was taken more than two weeks after the first. The original flower from the first picture is in the background and has red markings. The third photo, taken by Mary Sue Ittner, shows an unusually early bloom in January 2005. Mary Sue was able to grow this species for quite a number of years in her garden in a container, watered occasionally in summer, but otherwise exposed to the elements.

Zephyranthes atamasco, Bob RutemoellerZephyranthes atamasco, red markings on aged flower, Bob RutemoellerZephyranthes atamasco, an early bloom in January 2005, Mary Sue Ittner

The next two photos, of wild plants in North Carolina, were taken by Jay Yourch and Jim McKenney.

Zephyranthes atamasco, flowering in early May 2004 in central North Carolina, Jay YourchZephyranthes atamasco, blooming on April 23, 2005 in northern North Carolina, Jim McKenney

Photographs of Zephyranthes atamasco at a famous location near Chattahoochee, Florida taken in January 2007 by Alani Davis.

Zephyranthes, Alani DavisZephyranthes atamasco, Alani DavisZephyranthes atamasco, Alani DavisZephyranthes atamasco, Alani Davis

Zephyranthes candida is a widespread species that can be found growing in the wild from the southern United States to South America. It is thought to be native to Argentina and Uruguay and is found along rivers and in marshes where it gets year round rainfall except for a brief period in late summer. This species may be more widely grown than any other of the genus. It blooms in fall in response to rain storms. There are many forms that circulate in cultivation because of its ability to readily make seeds. This species likes a nice and warm summer. Nhu Nguyen grew this species in Louisiana where it gets brutal full sun but it loves the climate and multiplied readily. It bloomed periodically from spring to autumn. Winter temperatures can drop way below freezing for several days but the plants hold on to their leaves and recover without trouble. It is a very easy and rewarding species for warmer climates. In places with cooler summers in coastal California, it grows slower but still blooms nicely when the temperatures are warmer in the autumn. This species can tolerate a wide variety of soil conditions but seems to like moist (almost wet) and rich soils the best. It can catch Stagonospora curtisii when conditions are unfavorable.

The photos below were taken in the Florida panhandle by Alani Davis where these plants grow happily in their native habitat.

Zephyranthes candida closeup, Alani DavisZephyranthes candida closeup, Alani DavisZephyranthes candida group, Alani Davis

Photo 1 was taken by Lauw de Jager showing a massed blooming in France after a good fall rain and a dry summer. Photo 2 taken by Bob Rutemoeller is of plants growing in a tub along with a Meyer lemon, where they bloom really well in early fall. Photos 3-4 were taken by Nhu Nguyen at the UC Botanical Garden of plants originating from Argentina. These plants have much larger petals and are much more impressive than the ones we often see in cultivation.

Zephyranthes candida blooming in mass in France, Lauw de JagerZephyranthes candida growing in a tub along with a Meyer lemon, Bob RutemoellerZephyranthes candida, Argentinian form, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes candida, Argentinian form, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu Nguyen

Zephyranthes citrina is native to the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico. It has small, deep yellow flowers that very much resemble Z. flavissima. The photos of these two species on the web are impossible to tell apart. Zephyranthes citrina has 48 chromosomes, which helps to differentiate it from the 14 chromosomes of Z. flavissima of South America. The photos below were taken September 2007 by Jay Yourch. This form does not offset much, but a large colony of them can be built up quickly because of the abundant apomictic (sexual reproduction without fertilization) seed production.

Zephyranthes citrina, Jay YourchZephyranthes citrina, Jay Yourch

Zephyranthes drummondii is native to Texas, New Mexico and Mexico and has a large, white flowers opening in the late afternoon or evening. Photos 1-3 were taken June 2006 by Jay Yourch & Alani Davis. Photos 4-6 were taken by Nhu Nguyen of a form from Telos Rare Bulbs. This form is able to make seeds without needing another clone.

Zephyranthes drummondii, Jay YourchZephyranthes drummondii, Jay YourchZephyranthes drummondii, Alani DavisZephyranthes drummondii, from Telos Rare Bulbs, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes drummondii, from Telos Rare Bulbs, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes drummondii, from Telos Rare Bulbs, Nhu Nguyen

Zephyranthes flavissima is native to southern Brazil to northeastern Argentina. The flowers are bright yellow, much resembling Z. citrina. Zephyranthes flavissima has 14 chromosomes, which serves to differentiate it from Z. citrina (see Z. citrina entry above). It is almost impossible to tell these two species apart from the images posted on the web. Alberto Castillo? provided some key characteristics: Morphologically, Z. flavissima with leaves that grow in fountain fashion and the bulbs that are strongly offsetting rapidly forming a lawn. The leaves are a fresh green, shining, not dull (as in Z. citrina). The flowers have a canary yellow, and not as deep of a yellow as Z. citrina. The tepals are evidently subequal, that is the three outer are not exactly like the three inner as in Z. citrina. In cultivation, when enough water is provided in summer, the plants will remain evergreen without losing their leaves.

The photos below were taken by Tarcísio Eduardo Raduenz of plants from habitat at the border of Argentina and Brazil.

Zephyranthes flavissima, Tarcísio Eduardo RaduenzZephyranthes flavissima, Tarcísio Eduardo Raduenz

The photos below were taken by Nhu Nguyen of plants that originated from the same population as pictured above. Although these look different in the photos, they are of the same plants, just different year of blooming. In the Bay Area, it does fine outdoors, and keeps its leaves year round when moisture is provided. It blooms mostly in summer and autumn.

Zephyranthes flavissima, Brazilian form, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes flavissima, Brazilian form, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes flavissima, Brazilian form, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes flavissima, Brazilian form, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes flavissima, Brazilian form, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes flavissima, Brazilian form, Nhu Nguyen

Zephyranthes fosteri is from Mexico, where it is known as "little May flower". Photo 1 was taken by Ina Crossley. Photos 2-6 were taken by Nhu Nguyen at the UC Botanical Garden.

Zephyranthes fosteri, Ina CrossleyZephyranthes fosteri, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes fosteri, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes fosteri, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes fosteri, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes fosteri, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu Nguyen

Zephyranthes grandiflora is native to Central America. Photos taken June 2004 by Jay Yourch.

Zephyranthes grandiflora, Jay YourchZephyranthes grandiflora, Jay YourchZephyranthes grandiflora, Jay Yourch

Zephyranthes lindleyana is native to eastern Sierra Madre of Mexico. Photos taken April 2007 by Alani Davis.

Zephyranthes lindleyana, Alani DavisZephyranthes lindleyana, Alani Davis

Zephyranthes macrosiphon is native to eastern Mexico. It resembles Z. grandiflora, but has smaller flowers with shorter styles. Photos 1-2 were taken August 2004 by Jay Yourch.

Zephyranthes macrosiphon, Jay YourchZephyranthes macrosiphon, Jay Yourch

Zephyranthes mesochloa is native to South America and has white or pink flowers. Here you can see two different populations of Z. mesochloa photographed by Germán Roitman.

Zephyranthes mesochloa, Germán RoitmanZephyranthes mesochloa, Germán Roitman

Zephyranthes minima is white flushed pink on exterior of segments and native to Argentina, Bolivia (at altitudes of up to 2600 m), Uruguay, Paraguay, and Brazil. Photo by Alessandro Marinello.

Zephyranthes minima, Alessandro Marinello

Zephyranthes nelsonii is a rare species that I have never seen in cultivation. The scapes are quite tall (about 12 inches high) and the flowers are quite large, as well (4-5 inches in length). It is found in rocky, xeric escarpments and consequently I would imagine that it requires very good drainage. It is sympatric with Sprekelia drummondii and Tigridia sp. as they share the same habitat. (Sprekelia plants were blooming simultaneously a few feet away when these pictures were taken.) The plants were located in their natural habitat at roughly 2000 m in Zumpahuacan, Mexico (1 hr. south of Mexico City). I took pictures of two color variants. One is a light pink color with red stripes on the petals; this is the predominant color form. However, there was also a semi-alba variety that was growing in the same patch as these others, and is likely a mutation of some sort. I am not sure of the frequency with which this color variation shows up... it could actually be quite common. Some extra field work should answer that question. Photo taken April, 2005 by Dennis Szeszko.

Zephyranthes nelsonii standard coloration, Dennis SzeszkoZephyranthes nelsonii semi-alba, Dennis Szeszko

Zephyranthes primulina is another really pretty Zephyranthes. The outside, before the flower opens, is a yellow fading into a pink-peach color. Photo taken August 2003 by Lee Poulsen & 2005-2006 by Alani Davis.

Zephyranthes primulina, Lee PoulsenZephyranthes primulina, Alani DavisZephyranthes primulina, Alani Davis

Zephyranthes reginae is native to Mexico. It has moderate sized light yellow flowers. Like Z. citrina, it does not offset much, but a large colony of them can be built up quickly because of the abundant, possibly apomictic, seed production. Photos taken by Jay Yourch & Alani Davis.

Zephyranthes reginae, photo taken September 2007 by Jay YourchZephyranthes reginae, photo taken September 2007 by Jay YourchZephyranthes reginae, Alani DavisZephyranthes reginae, Alani DavisZephyranthes reginae, Alani Davis

Zephyranthes sp. Argentina Photos by Hans Joschko of plants obtained from a friend that originally were collected in the northern provinces of Argentina, in the border region between Salta and Tucuman at 1100 meters. Germán Roitman thinks it is Z. mesochloa, but Alberto Castillo thinks it may be a new species because Z. mesochloa is a lowland plant.

Zephyranthes mesochloa, Hans JoschkoZephyranthes mesochloa, Hans JoschkoZephyranthes mesochloa, Hans JoschkoZephyranthes mesochloa, Hans Joschko

Zephyranthes sp. Itajaí Photo by Tarcísio Eduardo Raduenz, taken December 2006 of a plant originating from Itajaí, southern Brazil.

Zephyranthes_ sp. Itajaí, Tarcísio Eduardo Raduenz

Zephyranthes sp. "datensis" These plants were cultivated from seeds whose parentage was originally from Brazil. They came as "Zephyranthes datensis" but this name does not exist in taxonomic databases. Photos taken by Nhu Nguyen.

Zephyranthes sp. 'datensis', Nhu NguyenZephyranthes sp. 'datensis', Nhu NguyenZephyranthes sp. 'datensis', Nhu NguyenZephyranthes sp. 'datensis', Nhu NguyenZephyranthes sp. 'datensis', Nhu Nguyen

Zephyranthes sp. Mexico The photos below were taken by Nhu Nguyen at the UC Botanical Garden.

Zephyranthes sp. Mexico, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu NguyenZephyranthes sp. Mexico, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu Nguyen

Zephyranthes sp. 'Labuffarosea' (sometimes spelled as 'Labuffarosa' or 'Labuffarosae') is an unsubscribed species (or natural hybrid) that is widespread in cultivation. It is similar to Z. grandiflora, but the leaves are dark green leaves and the flowers open rather flat with very broad tepals. See the 'Labuffarosea' entry.


Zephyranthes traubii is a species named for Hamilton Traub who spent much of his career on the taxonomy of North American bulbs. It is native to southeastern Texas and northeastern Mexico. The photo below was contributed by the UC Botanical Garden of a form from Nuevo Leon.

Zephyranthes traubii, UC Botanical Garden, Nuevo Leon form

Zephyranthes treatiae was a separate species but is now also called Zephyranthes atamasca var. treatiae (S.Watson) Meerow. These are wild examples in Jefferson County, Florida. Photos by Alani Davis.

Zephyranthes treatiae, Alani DavisZephyranthes treatiae, Alani DavisZephyranthes treatiae, Alani DavisZephyranthes treatiae, Alani Davis
Zephyranthes treatiae, Alani DavisZephyranthes treatiae, Alani DavisZephyranthes treatiae, Alani Davis

Zephyranthes verecunda is a species that is rarely seen in cultivation. The flowers in the picture emerged after the first rains in Mexico during the last week of April, 2005. The small but intensely colored flowers are held on a very short scape and resemble Crocus sp. in their shape and size. The flowers open in direct sunshine and are a dark magenta color. The plants were located in their natural habitat at roughly 2000 m in Zumpahuacan, Mexico (1 hr. south of Mexico City) in direct sunshine in a grassland growing in sandy soil over buried rocks. Photo by Dennis Szeszko.

Zephyranthes verecunda, Dennis Szeszko

Zephyranthes versicolor is pictured on the Habranthus wiki page.


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