Lilium Trumpet Section

Lilium is a large genus in the Liliaceae family. Information and pictures of species on the PBS wiki are found on section pages. This wiki page is for the Trumpet Section. Other sections and hybrids are linked below.


American Section A-M - American Section N-Z - Asiatic Section A-C - Asiatic Section D-K - Asiatic Section L-O - Asiatic Section P-Z - Candidum Section - Dauricum Section - Martagon Section - Oriental Section - Lilium Hybrids - Lilium index


Lilium formosanum, nominate form. Plants in cultivation at the Strybing Arboretum, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA. First photo by Ron Parsons. Second photo by David Pilling shows brown pollen whereas others have yellow pollen.

Lilium formosanum, Ron ParsonsLilium formosanum, David Pilling

Lilium formosanum var. pricei - This is a dwarf form of the much taller Formosa Lily. The taller 'type' species is sometimes considered weedy because it seeds about too readily. This short variety grows 12"-18" (30-45 cm) tall, is reliably hardy even in northern New England, but seems to be short-lived, lasting 2-3 years then dying out, but not to worry, typically a few seedlings show up. Here are two views showing a rogue seedling that got into my bed of Allium flavum ssp. tauricum color forms. The flowers are richly colored on the back, pristine white within, and powerfully sweet scented. First two photos by Mark McDonough. Photos three and four by Darm Crook.

Lilium formosanum var. pricei, Mark McDonoughLilium formosanum var. pricei, Mark McDonoughLilium formosanum v. pricei, Darm CrookLilium formosanum v. pricei, Darm Crook

Lilium leucanthum from Sichuan China. These plants were growing in the UC Berkeley Arboretum, photos 1-2 by Ron Parsons. Photo 3 of a bulb by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium leucanthum, Ron ParsonsLilium leucanthum, Ron ParsonsLilium leucanthum bulb, Pontus Wallstén

Lilium leucanthum var. centifolium from China. This variety is from W. Gansu and can grow to 10 feet tall. Here it is grown in New Jersey, photos by Arnold Trachtenberg.

Lilium leucanthum var. centifolium, Arnold TrachtenbergLilium leucanthum var. centifolium, Arnold Trachtenberg

Lilium 'Black Dragon' is a strain derived from Lilium leucanthum var. centifolium. The flowers have rose purple colouring on the outer of the tepals. No hybridisation was involved. The name 'Black Magic' is also used. Photos Janos Agoston.

Lilium 'Black Dragon', Janos AgostonLilium 'Black Dragon', Janos Agoston

Lilium longiflorum is the ever popular "Easter lily" which has been highly hybridized. The species is native to Japan; it can survive zone 1 winters out doors but if left in those conditions it will deteriorate and then disappear after the third summer. When grown in conditions to its liking, it is a robust lily growing up to 90 cm (3 feet) tall and producing clones that will flower the same year they were produced. Although related to L. formosanum and L. philippinense, it will accept a cool forced dormant period after which it will grow as vigorously as it always has. The florets grow in an umbel inflorescence and are white with a yellow throat and nicely scented. The first photo is one that was set behind the apple tree several years ago and forgotten. There are three stalks and nine flowers all open at the same time. It was grown in Long Beach, CA by Doug Westfall. The second photo of this species was taken by Janos Agoston. Photos three to six submitted by Darm Crook.

Lilium longiflorum, Doug WestfallLilium longiflorum, Janos AgostonLilium longiflorum, Darm CrookLilium longiflorum, Darm CrookLilium longiflorum, Darm CrookLilium longiflorum, Darm Crook

Photo of a bulb by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium longiflorum bulb, Pontus Wallstén

Lilium philippinense is one of the most southern based naturally occurring species; it is from the Philippines. It grows up to 90 cm (3 feet) tall; the florets are trumpet form, nicely flared and scented, with a green throat and have a green to brown reverse. From seed to first flower takes 8 to 10 months. It requires no dormant period and will not survive a forced dormancy period. Like L. formosanum it will produce off set clones and grow continuously year round. It is not cold hardy. This is said to be the lily that grows in the most tropical climate, however Lilium neilgherrense (see Lilium wallichianum) grows further South, in the Himalayas. Five photos submitted by Darm Crook.

Lilium philippinense, Darm CrookLilium philippinense, Darm CrookLilium philippinense, Darm CrookLilium philippinense, Darm CrookLilium philippinense, Darm Crook

Lilium regale, is native to Sichuan, China. This trumpet lilium will grow up to 120 cm (4 feet) tall, bearing usually up to 5 but once in a while as many as 8 sweetly scented florets in an umbel inflorescence. It is a reasonably early flowering trumpet, flowering in late July early August in a zone one environment. As such it is suited to areas with a short growing season. The first photo is of a plant in cultivation at the UC Botanical Garden by Ron Parsons. The next three photos were taken by Janos Agoston. The last one shows variety 'Album' which has pure white flowers. The photo of buds contrasts those of Album with the species. Regale produces a lot of seed, and exhibits apomixis. Seedlings are robust, and this is a good first lily to grow from seed. Seeds sown in year N produce flowers in year N+2.

Lilium regale, Ron ParsonsLiium regale buds, Janos AgostonLiium regale, Janos AgostonLiium regale 'Album', Janos AgostonLilium regale, David Pilling

Photos below with the last one being L. regale variety 'Album' posted by Darm Crook

Lilium regale, Darm CrookLilium regale, Darm CrookLilium regale, Darm CrookLilium regale, Darm CrookLilium regale 'Album', Darm Crook

A perfect Summer afternoon, 3pm on the 27th July 2013 by David Pilling, bees pollinate Lilium regale.


Lilium sargentiae grows to 1.5 metres tall, with funnel-shaped, fragrant flowers. This location is further south-west than those normally cited, which are in Sichuan. The first photo, by David Victor, was taken near the Liang Jang (Mekong) river, Yunnan, China. Photos, two and three by Arnold Trachtenberg, are of a bulb from a Chinese grower, Chen Yi. Photo four is by John Lykkegaard Johansen and shows bulbils. Photos 5-6 were taken by Nhu Nguyen from the UC Botanical Garden.

Lilium sargentiae, David VictorLilium sargentiae, Arnold TrachtenbergLilium sargentiae, Arnold TrachtenbergLilium sargentiae, John Lykkegaard JohansenLilium sargentiae, Nhu NguyenLilium sargentiae, Nhu Nguyen

Photos 1-4 below submitted by Darm Crook. Photo 5 of a bulb by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium sargentiae, Darm CrookLilium sargentiae, Darm CrookLilium sargentiae, Darm CrookLilium sargentiae, Darm CrookLilium sargentiae bulb, Pontus Wallstén

Lilium sulphureum is late blooming trumpet lily having a soft yellow glow from within. Note the long flower. It came into bloom the first week of August and had abundant stem bulbils. Here in the middle Atlantic states of the US, other trumpet lilies typically bloom from the last week of June through the first two weeks of July. First photo by Jim McKenney of a plant grown by Debby Sheuchenko in central Virginia from material received from Chen Yi. Photos 2-3, taken September 2004 by Lee Poulsen, have greener flowers than Jim's plant. Photo 4 of a bulb by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium sulphureum, Jim McKenneyLilium sulphureum, Lee PoulsenLilium sulphureum, Lee PoulsenLilium sulphureum bulb, Pontus Wallstén

Lilium wallichianum is a white species from the Himalayan region (India, Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim) where it is found on limestone slopes in open coniferous forests. Photo 1 by Ron Parsons. Photo 2-4 of bulbs by Pontus Wallstén, who comments that when bulbs are young, they have more of a whitish yellow colour, and when older, or when they have been out of the ground for a while, they go more purple pink, like some oriental hybrids.

Lilium wallichianum, Ron ParsonsLilium wallichianum bulb, Pontus WallsténLilium wallichianum bulb, Pontus WallsténLilium wallichianum bulb, Pontus Wallstén

American Section A-M - American Section N-Z - Asiatic Section A-C - Asiatic Section D-K - Asiatic Section L-O - Asiatic Section P-Z - Candidum Section - Dauricum Section - Martagon Section - Oriental Section - Lilium Hybrids - Lilium index


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Page last modified on September 14, 2015, at 05:01 PM