Bulb Day

This page is a random selection of wiki entries which is updated daily.
You can subscribe to it as an RSS feed RSS icon or on some browsers as a web slice RSS icon.
The RSS feed contains 'media' data and can be used as a 'photo feed' by programs such as screen savers, slide shows and picture frames.
Click to add Bulb Day to your MyYahoo page Add to My Yahoo!

From Spring Blooming Crocus Two on Monday 19th of February 2018 04:42:01 PM PST
Crocus danfordiae has small flowers, usually pale yellow with gray speckles on the outside, but there are also pale blue and white forms, according to Mathew. Because of its small flowers, Bowles considered it "a botanical curiosity rather than a decorative plant." It comes from the Anti-Taurus Mountains in Turkey. Photos by John Lonsdale.
Crocus danfordiae, John LonsdaleCrocus danfordiae, John LonsdaleCrocus danfordiae, John LonsdaleCrocus danfordiae, John Lonsdale

From Fall Blooming Crocus on Sunday 18th of February 2018 04:35:05 PM PST
Crocus boryi is native to southern and western Greece, some Ionian islands, and Crete. It flowers in late fall. The photo shows the typical flowers, which are cream-white and have rather thick tepals. These plants are grown in a bulb frame in Oregon, from seed obtained from the Archibalds. Photo by Jane McGary
Crocus boryi, Jane McGary

From South African Oxalis Eight on Saturday 17th of February 2018 04:29:09 PM PST
Oxalis pulchella Jacq. is a polymorphous group of plants, ranging from glabrous to pilose/hirsute. SANBI lists four possible varieties: var. glauca, var. leucotricha, var. pulchella, var. tomentosa and Cape Plants describes it as found on sandy lower slopes and flats at 250 to 450 m from southern Namibia to Swellendam (southwestern Cape). It blooms from May to June. Flower colours include white, pale yellow, yellow, salmon-rose and rose. The first form is from Koingnaas in Southern Namaqualand, and is totally glabrous. The second form pictured below is from west of Steinkopf, Namaqualand, with very large flowers. The last photo show the bulb structure, the plant slightly villose, from ENE of Kamieskroon. Photos by Christiaan van Schalkwyk.
Oxalis pulchella, Koingnaas, Christiaan van SchalkwykOxalis pulchella, Steinkopf, Christiaan van SchalkwykOxalis pulchella, Steinkopf, Christiaan van SchalkwykOxalis pulchella, bulb, Christiaan van Schalkwyk
Oxalis pulchella var. tomentosa Sond. is a variety with low, pubescent, mat forming foliage and large very pale salmon colored flowers. Photos from Mary Sue Ittner who obtained it from the Pacific Bulb Society BX in 2009. It did not bloom until the fall of 2013 (October-November). She started it into growth late summer this year and like many other fall blooming species she grows it may benefit from early watering before it starts to rain in California so it will have been in growth long enough at the time it normally would bloom and before the temperatures get colder.
Oxalis pulchella var. tomentosa, Mary Sue IttnerOxalis pulchella var. tomentosa, Mary Sue IttnerOxalis pulchella var. tomentosa, Mary Sue Ittner

From Manfreda on Friday 16th of February 2018 04:30:18 PM PST
Manfreda variegata 'El Naranjo form' The flower stalk on this one is relatively short; only about 3 feet tall. The first photo shows the flower part of the scape. The second photo shows the rosette of leaves at the base of the scape. The third is meant to show the entire plant in bloom. Photos taken May 2005 by Lee Poulsen.
Manfreda variegata 'El Naranjo' form, Lee PoulsenManfreda variegata 'El Naranjo' form, Lee PoulsenManfreda variegata 'El Naranjo' form, Lee Poulsen

From Erythronium Four on Thursday 15th of February 2018 05:45:51 PM PST
Erythronium 'Pagoda' is a yellow flowered erythronium that is a cross between E. tuolumnense and E. californicum 'White Beauty'. Photos 1 and 2 by John Lonsdale; photo 3 of shoots by David Pilling.
Erythronium 'Pagoda', John LonsdaleErythronium 'Pagoda', John LonsdaleErythronium 'Pagoda', David Pilling

From Pauridia on Thursday 15th of February 2018 04:55:21 AM PST
Pauridia minuta grows on damp flats and lower slopes from the Southwest Cape to Southern Cape areas. It has 3 to five leaves and white to pale pink bell shaped flowers. Photos by Cameron McMaster taken in the Overberg.
Pauridia minuta, Cameron McMasterPauridia minuta, Cameron McMaster

From Chloraea on Tuesday 13th of February 2018 04:13:23 PM PST
Chloraea crispa (Lindl.) is a terrestrial bulbous orchid with lanceolated leaves forming a basal rosette and 70 cm tall flower stems. It is native to south central Chile and blooms in summer. Picture taken in habitat by Osmani Baullosa.
Chloraea crispa, Osmani Baullosa

From Allium_cyathophorum on Monday 12th of February 2018 04:44:00 PM PST
Allium cyathophorum var. farreri (Stearn) Stearn (syn. Allium farreri Stearn) is native to China where it grows on grassy slopes at high elevations of around 2700-3600m. It has reddish purple flowers with stamens fused in a tube. It appreciates moist conditions in summer and tolerates shade. It flowers late spring to summer. First photo by John Lonsdale. Following two photos of first year flowers by RH grown in pots in the UK, initially obtained as Alium sibthorpianum from AGS seed. Last photo by Travis Owen shows the root mass. The roots are present year-round and should not be allowed to dry out.
Allium cyathophorum var. farreri, John LonsdaleAllum cyathophorum var. farreri, RHAllum cyathophorum var. farreri, RHAllum cyathophorum var. farreri roots, Travis Owen
Photos by David Pilling taken at the start of June 2013; this plant was grown from seed supplied as Alium sibthorpianum and sown at the start of 2009; it has been flowering for a couple of years.
Allium cyathophorum var. farreri, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri, David Pilling
Disassembling the flowers: these photographs were taken a few days later than the ones above and it is apparent the flowers are now more red. Photo 4 shows a ripe seed pod with seed visible. Photo 6 is of the roots after the plant had gone dormant at the end of the year. Flora of China says of the type species "Roots rather long, thick. Bulb solitary or clustered, cylindric; tunic grayish brown, fibrous, sometimes subreticulate." and provides an illustration.
Allium cyathophorum var. farreri, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri seed 28th July 2013, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri seed, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri roots 29th October 2013, David Pilling
Seeds were put in a zip-seal bag with damp kitchen towel on 14th December 2013 and exposed to outside temperatures (around 40F); by the middle of January 2014 they had begun to germinate as shown in photo 1. Photo 2 is of the shoots of mature plants.
Allium cyathophorum var. farreri seeds 20th January 2014, David PillingAllium cyathophorum var. farreri shoots 26th January 2014, David Pilling


From Paradisea on Sunday 11th of February 2018 04:40:49 PM PST
Paradisea lusitanica is a native to the mountains of Portugal and is taller with smaller flowers than Paradisea liliastrum. These pictures were taken in Wisley Gardens in the UK in May 2004 by Bob Rutemoeller.
Paradisea lusitanica, Bob RutemoellerParadisea lusitanica, Bob Rutemoeller

From Amianthium on Saturday 10th of February 2018 04:47:19 PM PST
Amianthium muscaetoxicum (Walter) A. Gray is found in data bases with many alternate spellings. It may have been published at one time with this spelling, but now Amianthium muscitoxicum seems to be preferred. Other synonyms you can find are Amiantanthus muscaetoxicum, Chrosperma muscitoxicum, Melanthium muscaetoxicum, Melanthium muscitoxicum, Zigadenus muscaetoxicum, Zigadenus muscitoxicum, Zigadenus muscitoxicus, and Zygadenus muscaetoxicus. It is native to the eastern United States. All parts of the plant are poisonous, especially the bulbs, and the specific epithet, muscaetoxicum, translates to Fly Poison, a common name for this plant. Photographed June 2008 in Linville Gorge Wilderness, Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina by Jay Yourch.
Amianthium muscitoxicum, Jay YourchAmianthium muscitoxicum, Jay Yourch

Page last modified on Monday 19th of February 2018 04:42:01 PM PST