North American Lilium A-M

Species Lilium that originate in North America from A-M are found on this page.


North American Lilium N-Z


Other Lilium sections and hybrids are linked below:
North American Lilium N-Z - Asiatic Section A-C - Asiatic Section D-K - Asiatic Section L-O - Asiatic Section P-Z - Candidum Section - Dauricum Section - Martagon Section - Oriental Section - Trumpet Section - Lilium Hybrids - Lilium index


Lilium bolanderi , Bolander's Lily is found in the Klamath ranges of California and into SW Oregon, elevation 150-1600 m. Photos by Ron Parsons from wild populations in Humboldt County, CA.

Lilium bolanderi, Ron ParsonsLilium bolanderi, Ron ParsonsLilium bolanderi, Ron Parsons

Lilium canadense is native to the east coast of Canada and parts of the New England States and can reach well over 6 feet in height, with 20 flowers per stem on long pedicels, with lemon yellow pointed tepals with dark purple spots. The flowers become bell shaped as they mature. This lily likes to grow on the edge of woodlands where it can obtain a little shade. Photos 1-3 were taken by Ron Moodycliffe. Photos 4-5 were taken of plants in situ in Vermont by Ron Parsons. Photo 6 illustrates the bulb, which is growing at the end of a thick stolon, by Janos Agoston.

Lilium canadense, Ron MoodycliffeLilium canadense, Ron MoodycliffeLilium canadense, Ron MoodycliffeLilium canadense, Ron ParsonsLilium canadense, Ron ParsonsLilium canadense bulb, grid is 1×1 cm, Janos Agoston

Photos below submitted by Darm Crook.

Lilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm Crook

Lilium canadense var. coccineum (Pursh 1814) is a variety not recognized by all. Two views in photos 1 and 2 from Arnold Trachtenberg; reverse of tepals are alternate in appearance. Photos 3-5 submitted by Darm Crook. This variety has extreme colour variations, from almost pink, to light orange, crimson, dark orange plus bi-coloured reverse of orange and yellow, the spotting patterns have just as much variation, from almost nothing to very heavy. Photo 6 of a bulb Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium canadense coccineum, Arnold TrachtenbergLilium canadense coccineum, Arnold TrachtenbergLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense coccineum bulb, Pontus Wallstén

Lilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm Crook
Lilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm CrookLilium canadense, Darm Crook

Lilium canadense var. flavum (Pursh 1814) is another variety not recognized by Kew. This variety has yellow flowers spotted crimson to brown. Photos submitted by Darm Crook.

Lilium canadense v. flavum, Darm CrookLilium canadense v. flavum, Darm CrookLilium canadense v. flavum, Darm CrookLilium canadense v. flavum, Darm Crook
Lilium canadense v. flavum, Darm CrookLilium canadense v. flavum, Darm CrookLilium canadense v. flavum, Darm Crook

Lilium catesbaei from southeastern North America, requires conditions which would kill most lilies: wet, hot, acidic soil. It generally blooms late in the year and typically there is only one flower. Grown by bog plant guru John Hummer and photographed by Jim McKenney. Two forms are shown here. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the plant with spidery flowers originated in northern Florida. The one with broader tepals purportedly came from coastal North Carolina.

Lilium catesbaei, Jim McKenneyLilium catesbaei, Jim McKenney

Variance of wild plants from adjacent Bay, Gulf, and Liberty Counties in the central panhandle of Florida. Photos by Alani Davis.

Lilium catesbaei, Alani DavisLilium catesbaei, Alani DavisLilium catesbaei, Alani DavisLilium catesbaei, Alani DavisLilium catesbaei, Alani DavisLilium catesbaei, Alani Davis

An ananthocyanic form found in the Florida panhandle. Photos by Alani Davis.

Lilium catesbaei, Alani DavisLilium catesbaei, Alani Davis

Lilium columbianum grows from Northern California north to Canada. Flowers are golden yellow to bright orange with dark purple spots or blotches and up to 30 flowers per stem. In photo 1 by Ron Moodycliffe the flowers are golden yellow. Photos 2-4 are from Richard Haard. The last shows germinating seeds: 30 days warm strat (50 °F) then 2 weeks cool (40 °F). Photo 5 of a bulb by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium columbianum, Ron MoodycliffeLilium columbianum, Richard HaardLilium columbianum, Richard HaardLilium columbianum seed, Richard HaardLilium columbianun bulb, Pontus Wallstén

The first three photos by Bob Rutemoeller show plants growing in mass along the highway in Northern California. The last three photos from Ron Parsons show more plants in the wild, found in Douglas County, Oregon (photos 4,5) and along highway 101 Del Norte County, California (photo 6).

Lilium columbianum, Bob RutemoellerLilium columbianum, Bob RutemoellerLilium columbianum, Bob RutemoellerLilium columbianum, Douglas County, Oregon, Ron ParsonsLilium columbianum, Douglas County, Oregon, Ron ParsonsLilium columbianum, Del Norte County, California, Ron Parsons

This species grows into British Columbia (BC) Canada and continues north through the BC interior with its last known site in BC being around Ft. Saint John. It also grows north of the last known BC site in the Yukon Territories Canada on the Liard Plato. The florets are held on arching pedicels in a raceme inflorescence. In Hay River there are stems that have produced up to eighteen florets. The foliage is set in whorls; some of them can be partial whorls. The colour varies from orange to a light yellow. Nine photos of two colour forms submitted by Darm Crook.

Lilium columbianum, Darm CrookLilium columbianum, Darm CrookLilium columbianum, Darm CrookLilium columbianum, Darm CrookLilium columbianum, Darm CrookLilium columbianum, Darm Crook
Lilium columbianum, Darm CrookLilium columbianum, Darm CrookLilium columbianum, Darm Crook

Lilium grayi found at scattered sites in the mountains of western Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee. Rarely seen in gardens in the eastern states and seems to grow more freely in cooler northern areas. Photo 1 by Wayne Crist of a plant grown by Jim McKenney in his bog trays, with Sarracenia in the background. Photo 2 of a bulb by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium grayi, Wayne CristLilium grayi, Pontus Wallstén

Lilium humboldtii see the Lilium humboldtii page. Representative photos of this species by Mary Sue Ittner, Ron Parsons, Nhu Nguyen and Jim Duggan.

Lilium humboldtii, Mary Sue IttnerLilium humboldtii, Ron ParsonsLilium humboldtii, UC Botanical Garden, Nhu NguyenLilium humboldtii, Nhu NguyenLilium humboldtii, Nhu NguyenLilium humboldtii, Jim Duggan

Lilium kelleyanum from the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains, eastern side, 8-9500'. Photo 1 by John Longanecker. Photos 2-3 by Ron Parsons, wild population Fresno County California, early July 2006. Photo 4 of a bulb by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium kelleyanum, John LonganeckerLilium kelleyanum, Ron ParsonsLilium kelleyanum, Ron ParsonsLilium kelleyanum bulb, Pontus Wallstén

Lilium kelloggii from the redwood region of Northern California to Southwest Oregon, growing on dry slopes with wet winters and some summer moisture from fog. The flowers appear in June and have a soft, sweet fragrance. The pictured plant is growing in a raised bed in NW Oregon, covered from mid-November to mid-February. First photo by Jane McGary. The next two, by John Longanecker, are of a potted specimen grown from seed gathered in Kneeland, Humboldt County, CA. where it grows in a fog drip zone at 1700'. It was grown in Placerville, CA. El 2240' zone 7 banana belt. Photos four and five taken by Mary Sue Ittner are of garden plants blooming from seed. Photo 6 of bulbs by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium kelloggii, Jane McGaryLilium kelloggii, John LonganeckerLilium kelloggii, John LonganeckerLilium kelloggii, Mary Sue IttnerLilium kelloggii, Mary Sue IttnerLilium kelloggii bulb, Pontus Wallstén

Photos taken by Ron Parsons of plants in situ in Humboldt County, California.

Lilium kelloggii, Ron ParsonsLilium kelloggii, Ron Parsons

Photos by Darm Crook of several seedlings' first flowering; photo one shows a first day open floret, photo four shows the same floret on day ten; the last photo shows a floret on day 13, the last day it had any tepals left.

Lilium kelloggii, Darm CrookLilium kelloggii, Darm CrookLilium kelloggii, Darm CrookLilium kelloggii, Darm CrookLilium kelloggii, Darm CrookLilium kelloggii, Darm Crook
Lilium kelloggii, Darm Crook

Lilium maritimum is a rare lily with red tubular flowers and is found in California in the southern part of the North Coast ranges where it is found in scrub, fens, or gaps in the closed-cone forests, usually in low places where it stays wet longer. We have garden plants, but it is found in the wild near us and that is where the first two pictures were taken by Bob Rutemoeller. The next two by Mary Sue Ittner were taken of plants in the road verges. The fifth was taken by Ron Moodycliffe in a paddock near Ft. Bragg, California and the last by Ron Parsons Sonoma County, California. Germination is cool hypogeal, small bulbs are formed in winter and leaves appear in spring.

Lilium maritimum, Bob RutemoellerLilium maritimum, Bob RutemoellerLilium maritimum, Mary Sue IttnerLilium maritimum, Mary Sue IttnerLilium maritimum, Ron MoodycliffeLilium maritimum, Ron Parsons

Photos of bulbs by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium maritimum bulb, Pontus WallsténLilium maritimum bulb, Pontus Wallstén

Lilium michauxii is native to Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana and Florida in the United States. It likes dry, well-drained soils. It is commonly called the 'Carolina lily'. Photos taken in Tyler County, Texas by Justin Smith.

Lilium michauxii, Justin SmithLilium michauxii, Justin Smith

Lilium michiganense is found in Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, other eastern areas of the United States and Southern Ontario Canada. It prefers moist acidic soils. Photos 1-2 by John Lonsdale. Photo 3 by Darm Crook. Photo 4 of a bulb by Pontus Wallstén.

Lilium michiganense, John LonsdaleLilium michiganense, John LonsdaleLilium michiganense, Darm CrookLilium michiganense bulb, Pontus Wallstén

More photos from Darm Crook.

Lilium michiganense, Darm CrookLilium michiganense, Darm CrookLilium michiganense, Darm CrookLilium michiganense, Darm CrookLilium michiganense, Darm CrookLilium michiganense, Darm Crook

American Section N-Z - Asiatic Section A-C - Asiatic Section D-K - Asiatic Section L-O - Asiatic Section P-Z - Candidum Section - Dauricum Section - Martagon Section - Oriental Section - Trumpet Section - Lilium Hybrids - Lilium index


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Page last modified on May 06, 2014, at 05:43 PM